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Spartacus Breaking His Chains This nineteen century sixteen inch sculpture was created by Denis Foyatier. The sculpture is of Spartacus, a man who served as a leader in a revolt

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Introduction

Christopher Yeung Humanities Paper 3 15/11/05 Spartacus Breaking His Chains This nineteen century sixteen inch sculpture was created by Denis Foyatier. The sculpture is of Spartacus, a man who served as a leader in a revolt against slavery. This statue was composed of bronze and could be distinguished by its fine polish and style. This bronze statue stood in a mobile upright position, the left foot extended forward, the arms crossed around the lower chest region. Foyatier succeeded in producing a vivid and convincing figure by using the techniques of shape, texture and details. His techniques suggest and appeal to a sense of intense power and vigor. The brooding stance and overall shape of Spartacus gives the sculpture the appearance of exuding energy; the use of curves and lines gives Spartacus a distinct structure and aids in achieving a greater degree of realism. ...read more.

Middle

There is also a dominant "s" like shape runs through the body beginning from above the knees and continues until the neck, this "s" like curvature provides the figure with a sense of autonomous life. The rough contrasting texture Foyatier uses makes Spartacus much more realistic and proves to be very effective. His use of highly stylized polish contrasts the shades of the arms and legs. He uses a lighter shade of polish around Spartacus's muscles; these highly polished areas provide sheen and highlight strength and power. The use of different shades of polish is imperative to the sculpture because it allows his spectators to focus on the more central parts of Spartacus. The uneven curly texture in the hair also plays an important role; it adds a more realistic image to Spartacus's identity. ...read more.

Conclusion

In his majestic stance he is caught in the midst of breaking his chains. Foyatier's inclusion of a knife in his right hand and a chain in his left are crucial, as it reveals information about Spartacus's imprisonment and even his freedom. He also presents this enraged warrior without any clothing to further illustrate masculinity and to reinforce the notion of raw power within this character. Foyatier with the use of many techniques succeeds in producing a vibrant and convincing figure. Foyatier's techniques prove to be essential and very effective as they introduced energy which played a major role in contributing to the realism of Spartacus. The use of shape conveyed a sense of strength while his use of texture brought the statue to life. These techniques of sculpting not only helped me to gain a greater appreciation for art but assisted me in obtaining a true understanding of struggles of Rome. ...read more.

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