• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Struggle for Freedom

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Struggle for Freedom In the short story Flight by Doris Lessing and Dubliners: An Encounter by James Joyce, have many of the same literary techniques employed through the themes and imagery. Thematically, these two short stories are very similar because they both are about youth growing up which leads to escape or freedom during the childhood and adolescence years. Lessing's story is about a grandfather who is possessive of his granddaughter and does not want her grow-up. Because of this, he tries to control her because he does not want to be alone, and most importantly because this was his last granddaughter out of four to mature. As for Joyce's story, it is mainly about the relationship between Father Butler and the boys, where the boys are faced with boredom at school and are spurred by excitement found in magazine stories about the American Wild West, two young boys skip school to take a trip to "The Pigeon-house." ...read more.

Middle

. . " "Well, what is it now?" "She's in the garden with Steven." "Now you just sit down and have your tea." He stumped his feet alternatively, thump, thump, on the hollow wooden floor and shouted: "She'll marry him. I'm telling you, she'll be marrying him next!" - pg. 386 In addition, the age of Alice is brought up, which shows that Alice is in her adolescent years and is ready to take flight. This is found when the grandfather says: "She's eighteen. Eighteen!". A similar situation occurred in Dubliners: An Encounter is when the narrator (one of the boys) says the following: "The adventures related in the literature of the Wild West were remote from my nature but, at least, they opened doors of escape." "The summer holidays were near at hand when I made up my mind to break out of the weariness of school life for one day at least." ...read more.

Conclusion

As for Joyce's story, he gives detailed descriptions of imagery of the day of the adventure. One scene that has several descriptions of imagery used the words: "long grass, mild sunny morning, frail canvas shoes, tramload of business people, tall trees, little light green leaves." Joyce also describes Dublin's commerce area as: "curls of woolly smoke, brown fishing fleet, big white sailing vessel." Effective Transition Sentence Linking Ideas: Main Points connected to thesis: Back up the text referencing to story What causes these similarities and/or differences? What effect (or cost) do they have on the subjects? On society? What do the similarities and/or differences show about your subjects? About society? Concluding, This should make it a very suitable story for young people preparing for exams: Alice's situation will be one that you face now or will face soon. How do you feel about this prospect? Is it scary, or exciting or both? Leaving home and becoming independent are things which most people face sooner or later. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level James Joyce section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level James Joyce essays

  1. An analytical study of 'The Pit and The Pendulum', 'An Encounter' and 'The Pedestrian', ...

    Many sources, however, maintain that the story's closure was dictated by demanding time restrictions implemented by Poe's publishers5. Another reason for Poe choosing a first person narrator is perhaps that this perspective gives us a stronger feeling of entrapment due to our constant awareness of the innermost feelings of the protagonist.

  2. Analyse the main themes and narrative devices introduced in The Sister

    At this time there was a nationalistic malaise cast over Dublin and this is represented by the shadow of the sundial. We have already seen that the priest's death day, July 1st, is significant in a religious context but it also is the day on which the Protestant King William

  1. The plight of the individual is most pertinently expressed through the plight of women ...

    However, that is not to say that the plight of the individual is not shown through men in 'Dubliners'. They are also affected by paralysis and ensnarement in societal values. One of the best examples of male paralysis is in 'A Little Cloud'.

  2. Depiction of childhood in 'Dubliners'

    some mysterious figure or being and is instead something which gives rise to idle gossip amongst neighbours and relatives. This would suggest that the boy has experienced an epiphany of sorts, yet another theme constant throughout 'Dubliners'. By using this method of the narrator being detached at the end of

  1. Discuss Joyce's treatment of women in Dubliners, Portrait and selected chapters of Ulysses.

    Stephen creates within himself visions of beauty based on women who strike him as beautiful. This highlights the dichotomy created by the text in the differential between the traditional teachings of the Catholic Church regarding sexual abstinence and the necessity of those same pleasures in the continuance of the species.

  2. DUBLINERS - What picture do you think that Joyce gives of growing up in ...

    than it was then and at that time this would have led to some conflict between Protestants (who were considered English or Unionist and unwelcome in Ireland) and Roman Catholics who were predominantly Nationalist (considering themselves to be true Irish citizens).

  1. James Joyce: An Exhaustion at the

    The more of the radiance she received. The more hoots the pupils threw forth. A tribute of howls by the time Joyce was through with sudden strokes of effective hands. M-sis equates with light. No M-sis, a y-intercept with gloom.

  2. The Boarding House, written by James Joyce, takes place in a small neighborhood located ...

    Doran to marry her. At this "right moment", Mrs. Mooney's intervenes. Her act of coming between the two "lovers" is imaged perfectly by Joyce: "She dealt with moral problems as a cleaver deals with meat: and in this case she had made up her mind." The simile serves to summarize both Mrs.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work