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Struggle for Freedom

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Introduction

Struggle for Freedom In the short story Flight by Doris Lessing and Dubliners: An Encounter by James Joyce, have many of the same literary techniques employed through the themes and imagery. Thematically, these two short stories are very similar because they both are about youth growing up which leads to escape or freedom during the childhood and adolescence years. Lessing's story is about a grandfather who is possessive of his granddaughter and does not want her grow-up. Because of this, he tries to control her because he does not want to be alone, and most importantly because this was his last granddaughter out of four to mature. As for Joyce's story, it is mainly about the relationship between Father Butler and the boys, where the boys are faced with boredom at school and are spurred by excitement found in magazine stories about the American Wild West, two young boys skip school to take a trip to "The Pigeon-house." ...read more.

Middle

. . " "Well, what is it now?" "She's in the garden with Steven." "Now you just sit down and have your tea." He stumped his feet alternatively, thump, thump, on the hollow wooden floor and shouted: "She'll marry him. I'm telling you, she'll be marrying him next!" - pg. 386 In addition, the age of Alice is brought up, which shows that Alice is in her adolescent years and is ready to take flight. This is found when the grandfather says: "She's eighteen. Eighteen!". A similar situation occurred in Dubliners: An Encounter is when the narrator (one of the boys) says the following: "The adventures related in the literature of the Wild West were remote from my nature but, at least, they opened doors of escape." "The summer holidays were near at hand when I made up my mind to break out of the weariness of school life for one day at least." ...read more.

Conclusion

As for Joyce's story, he gives detailed descriptions of imagery of the day of the adventure. One scene that has several descriptions of imagery used the words: "long grass, mild sunny morning, frail canvas shoes, tramload of business people, tall trees, little light green leaves." Joyce also describes Dublin's commerce area as: "curls of woolly smoke, brown fishing fleet, big white sailing vessel." Effective Transition Sentence Linking Ideas: Main Points connected to thesis: Back up the text referencing to story What causes these similarities and/or differences? What effect (or cost) do they have on the subjects? On society? What do the similarities and/or differences show about your subjects? About society? Concluding, This should make it a very suitable story for young people preparing for exams: Alice's situation will be one that you face now or will face soon. How do you feel about this prospect? Is it scary, or exciting or both? Leaving home and becoming independent are things which most people face sooner or later. ...read more.

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