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Suicide in the Trenches

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Introduction

SUICIDE IN THE TRENCHES By Siegfried Sassoon In the poem "SUICIDE IN THE TRENCHES" Siegfried Sassoon uses figurative language, descriptive detail, tone, structure and sound to create a powerful impression of the horror and wastage of war. War is viewed as a product of ignorance and it is equated with intense suffering and the destruction of all that is beautiful and innocent. The first stanza of the poem depicts a boy who is too "simple" or naive to understand the true horrific nature of war. ...read more.

Middle

The tone in this stanza is quiet upbeat for a poem that is about war and death. The boy symbolizes all the guys that went to war for us and lost their lives in many different horrific situations. Stanza two presents imagery, which provides a stark contrast to the descriptive detail in stanza one. We notice the effects of war on this once innocent and simple boy. ...read more.

Conclusion

Stanza three uses powerful and confronting language to highlight the fact that the war is based on ignorance and hypocrisy. By the abrupt use of the second person to open the stanza it makes the opening line seem confronting and vulgar. Sassoon put the people to shame by telling them to "sneak home" for they are cowards. This stanza has an angry tone to it, which creates guilt to the readers. "SUICIDE IN THE TRENCHES" is an antiwar poem, which appeals to both emotions and interest to the audience because of its effective use of techniques and language. -Christy Marie Parczewski- ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay



This essay has the potential to be a good essay. The writer understands the poem and its message. Accurate use of poetic language is used. The main fault of this essay is that there are not enough quotes which could be further analysed and discussed. 2 Stars

Marked by teacher Katie Dixon 30/07/2013

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