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The Crucible Revision Notes

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐The crucible The crucible 1950 America Contemporary Good God Capitalists Governments in America Christian Western world Evil Devil Communism Terrorism Asylum seekers 1. Hard way of life ? hard to create an existence 2. People appointed to find people who were not attending church- almost like a crime 3. Live in a close community to protect them from things in the land 4. The old disciplines start to become irrelevant ? people start to feel safe 5. People left cos of harsh persecution to start a new life 6. Repressed society Conflict: 1. Puritans and those who are rebelling against the puritan way of life 2. Between landscape ? puritans saw it as barbaric (vicious, fatal) 3. Land war ? Thomas Putnam and Francus Nurse 4. Conflict of the people against the Theocracy 5. Conflict of neighbour against neighbour 6. Outlet for wrong doing 7. Vengeance for old grudges 8. Conflict of ones conscious 9. The witch hunt became an excuse to: 10. Repress those who sought greater individual freedom 11. Became an excuse for some to express their guilt publicly 12. An excuse to seek vengeance on long held grievances against neighbours (Thomas Putnam) 13. Gain land, land lust (Thomas Putnam) 14. Based on jealousy (Anna Putnam) 15. Grieving for her dead baby Barbaric frontier: Cruel and brutal Subjugated: To bring under control; conquer. Subservient: Prepared to obey others unquestioningly Resolution: Parris: pg 34. 1. Non compensated for firewood 2. See him as greedy - avaricious (Having or showing an extreme greed for wealth or material gain) 3. Concerned about his reputation in the town Putnam pg. 34 1. Greedy + avaricious Mr Hale 1. Authority Abigail: I look for John Proctor that took me from my sleep and put knowledge in my heart! I never knew what pretense Salem was, I never knew the lying lessons I was taught by all these Christian women and their covenanted men! ...read more.

Middle

Quote ?I look for John Proctor that took me from my sleep and put knowledge in my heart... And now you bid me tear the light out of my eyes? I will not! I cannot! You loved me, John Proctor, and whatever sin it is, you love me yet?. (pg 30) Role in the conflicts She initiates the conflict ? is the catalyst because of her jealousy. She perpetuates the conflict by bullying the other girls, lying to the judge, denouncing all those who have hurt her and will not allow the conflict to be resolved by confessing she lied. 1. Manipulative 2. Passionate, adventurous but finds herself incarcerated in a straightjacket of moral inhibitions 3. When she is with John, we see a softer side to her that is totally opposite to the ruthless personality she demonstrates. 4. Non-conforming 5. Able to control her fear when in danger 6. Quick thinking 7. Strong sense of self-preservation 8. Capable of violence 9. The initiator of conflict, perpetuates the conflict and will not allow the conflict to be resolved ? the villain of the play 10. She has created havoc in Salem ? the sense of power she has over all the town is overwhelming to her. 11. She takes extreme joy in the attention she receives and in the suffering she has caused to others through her accusations. 12. She takes revenge, not only on John, who has refused her advances, but also on the whole town who have frustrated her life. 13. The people of Salem encounter conflict through the stories of Abigail and the other girls 14. Refuses to become a victim. Before her pretence is revealed, she steals Parris? money and hops a ship to Barbados Elizabeth Proctor Main motivation Hurt by the affair, Elizabeth attempts to show Abigail for who she is; a liar and a whore. She also wants to shame John in an attempt to make him feel guilty, although she does forgive him Main conflict Is with Abigail because she tried to steal her husband. ...read more.

Conclusion

He seizes the opportunity to: 5. Condemn Parris who he hates 6. All those in Salem who had failed to recognise his self-appointed authority 7. A man totally without conscience; uses his daughter to condemn neighbours 8. In a conflict, ruthlessness by an individual to perpetuate a conflict is necessary Reverend Parris Main motivation He wanted to gain more respect, especially from the Elders. He also wanted the ownership of the house that was owned b y the church. Main conflict With John Proctor as he didn?t regularly attend church. He criticised Paris? sermons and way of preaching. He is easily offended. Personality Easily insulted, ignorant, controlling, expects to be respected, greedy, violent Effect on plot Tries to influence people like Danforth and Hathorne to go against John Proctor. He can be seen as the catalyst for the witch hunt as Abigail feared Parris? violent nature and what punishment he would inflict on her for dancing in the woods. Quot ?I want a mark of confidence, is all! I am your third preacher in seven years. You people seem not to comprehend that a minister is the Lord?s man in the parish; a minister is not to be so lightly crossed and contradicted?. Excellency, since I came to Salem, this man is blackening my name?. Role in the conflicts 1. Minister ? inhumane, selfish, self-assertive, self-important, greedy 2. Seeking to serve his own interests and protect the security of his position 3. Bitter at his lack of acceptance by the community 4. Is forced to acknowledge his own hand in the murder of innocent people Tituba Main motivation Stay alive after being accused of witchcraft Main conflict Abigail blames Tituba for making the soup and calling the devil Personality Reproachful, castigating, sceptical, dishonest, discrediting Effect on plot She blames and accuses people, including her employer, Parris of being a witch in order tyo save herself. Quote ?No, no, Sir, I don?t truck with no devil? p4 Role in the conflicts She lead the girls into the dancing, which then lead to all the lies and hysteria ...read more.

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