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The Daffodils

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Introduction

THE DAFFODILS I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed - and gazed - but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought: For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. ...read more.

Middle

Just thinking of the flowers is enough to make him no longer feel lonely. The memory helps to lift his mood. I think that Wordswoth is trying to tell us that if we have a memory, it can last forever. Even when he was feeling sad and lonely Wordsworth is able to think of a place in the back of his mind, and project himself there. He is trying to tell us that we can all do this. I think that the tone of this poem is sad and lonely in parts but happy and cheerful in other parts. The atmosphere is melancholy for the two opening lines. However, as soon as Wordsworth begins to recount his experience, the poem very quickly becomes quite uplifting. The poem has a lilting rhythm, which carries you with it. I think that this is caused by the length of the sentences. Every line of the poem has eight syllables. ...read more.

Conclusion

In 'The Daffodils', twice the flowers cheer up Wordsworth and make him no longer feel lonely. Although, sometimes Wordsworth almost seems to enjoy being on his own. He displays this by saying 'which is the bliss of solitude.' This is Romantic poetry. He only uses similes twice in the whole poem. Both times are when he says 'I wandered lonely as a cloud', which is the opening line, and 'Continuous as the stars that shine'. The second simile also shows the large number of daffodils that he can see. I really liked 'The Daffodils'. I think that it is a brilliant poem as well as one that is just enjoyable to read. It has a storyline that everyone can relate to and he has definitely been successful in getting his point across. After looking so much at this poem I have realised how great it is. Wordsworth uses so many different ways to pull you into the atmosphere of the poem, that you feel as if you are really there, experiencing it. I enjoyed looking at 'The Daffodils' and look forward to reading more of William Wordsworth's work. ...read more.

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