• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Daffodils

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

THE DAFFODILS I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed - and gazed - but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought: For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. ...read more.

Middle

Just thinking of the flowers is enough to make him no longer feel lonely. The memory helps to lift his mood. I think that Wordswoth is trying to tell us that if we have a memory, it can last forever. Even when he was feeling sad and lonely Wordsworth is able to think of a place in the back of his mind, and project himself there. He is trying to tell us that we can all do this. I think that the tone of this poem is sad and lonely in parts but happy and cheerful in other parts. The atmosphere is melancholy for the two opening lines. However, as soon as Wordsworth begins to recount his experience, the poem very quickly becomes quite uplifting. The poem has a lilting rhythm, which carries you with it. I think that this is caused by the length of the sentences. Every line of the poem has eight syllables. ...read more.

Conclusion

In 'The Daffodils', twice the flowers cheer up Wordsworth and make him no longer feel lonely. Although, sometimes Wordsworth almost seems to enjoy being on his own. He displays this by saying 'which is the bliss of solitude.' This is Romantic poetry. He only uses similes twice in the whole poem. Both times are when he says 'I wandered lonely as a cloud', which is the opening line, and 'Continuous as the stars that shine'. The second simile also shows the large number of daffodils that he can see. I really liked 'The Daffodils'. I think that it is a brilliant poem as well as one that is just enjoyable to read. It has a storyline that everyone can relate to and he has definitely been successful in getting his point across. After looking so much at this poem I have realised how great it is. Wordsworth uses so many different ways to pull you into the atmosphere of the poem, that you feel as if you are really there, experiencing it. I enjoyed looking at 'The Daffodils' and look forward to reading more of William Wordsworth's work. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level William Wordsworth section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level William Wordsworth essays

  1. Form and meaning of The Daffodils by W.Wordsworth and Miracle on St.David’s Day by ...

    "An afternoon yellow and open-mouthed with daffodils." A picture is already in the readers head of a warm, sunny afternoon in spring somewhere in a forest where there is a lot of greenery and a large country house hidden from view, peaceful and graceful.

  2. How do poems 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth and 'Miracle on St. David's Day' by ...

    That the woman is oblivious to her surroundings it makes the caged feeling worse, as the woman seems to have given up. Even the structure of the poem suggest a cage like feeling. All of the verses, apart from the last are all 5 lines long, written in blocks, each line with approximately 9-10 syllables.

  1. Explore the connections and differences between 'Miracle on St. David's Day' and 'Daffodils'.

    stanza covers a particular aspect: surroundings, description of daffodils' movement, comparison to show how they differed from surroundings (outdid the waves...) and finally what effect they had on him. The rhyming and rhythm creates a blithe, buoyant and sprightly atmosphere, not only emphasising the movement of daffodils as they dance

  2. The Romantic Turn in Poetry; Mimeticism vs. Expressivity in William Wordsworth's "I Wandered Lonely ...

    Functions All this is typical of the emotive (or expressive) function, one of the two main functions employed in this poem. The expressive function focuses on addresser and not the addressee and produces an impression of a certain emotion such as joy or solitude.

  1. The Daffodils

    In this poem - 'The Daffodils' - Wordsworth is trying to stress the beauty of nature and how the daffodils have affected him. The words he uses to describe this beauty creates a magical, dream-like atmosphere and makes it seem so unreal.

  2. Comparison with 'The Thought-Fox' and 'I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud'

    The rhyming is strict and it is written in the 'I' form to say that it was a personal experience. The poet repeat the word 'dancing' to emphasize the fact that the 'daffodils' were 'dancing'.

  1. Write about the importance of memory in Wordsworth's "Daffodils" and Clarke's "Miracle on St. ...

    and "crowd" showing that there must have been at least one hundred. This could also mean that the person being described as a cloud being accepted back into society. Wordsworth describes the daffodils as "golden" with illustrates the radiant colour and wealth of the memory.

  2. English essay about Worthwords

    It is an evening moon representing portraying a romantic image. 3rd stanza - I set my eye on the moon as I travelled through the meadow (lea); my horse walked on heavily, and we drew near to those precious paths which takes me to my lover.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work