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The effective depiction of realistic settings is essential to the success of Pride and Prejudice. This particular description is that of Hunsford Parsonage,

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Introduction

The effective depiction of realistic settings is essential to the success of Pride and Prejudice. This passage (Hunsford Parsonage) of Pride and Prejudice is quite uncharacteristic of Austen, seeing as it is one of the few instances when she actually describes setting in the novel. This particular description is that of Hunsford Parsonage, where Mr Collins and Charlotte Lucas have made their home after getting married. Although she does use some description, Austen creates a microcosm of Mr Collins and Charlotte's marriage through the description; neat and convenient, effective in a sense that it gives the description of setting more of an allegorical meaning. Austen creates anticipation for the description of the Parsonage mainly through other characters' reactions. Elizabeth is said to have found 'the prospect of her northern tour' a 'constant source of delight' and 'Every eye was in search of the Parsonage', 'every' being repeated as a superlative to increase excitement for perhaps a more vivid and astounding description of the parsonage itself. However, there are hints of the darker and perhaps slightly more sinister aspect of Hunsford; the 'paling of Rosings Park was their boundary' is mentioned, the sharp spikes of the paling possibly representing the rigidity of their marriage, and the boundary representing their isolation. In addition, it is mentioned that 'at length the parsonage was discernable', showing how far they had to travel just in order to reach it, again depicting their remoteness from society. ...read more.

Middle

The importance of the outdoors is emphasized in both Pride and Prejudice and The Yellow Wallpaper. Mr Collins 'invited them to take a stroll in the garden'. The fact that he had to show his guests the garden himself and every view 'was pointed out with a minuteness which left beauty entirely behind' contrasts to the later description at Pemberley, when Elizabeth, 'after slightly surveying' the room, 'went to the window to enjoy its prospect', and as they moved through the rooms all she could do was look out of every window where 'there were beauties to be seen'. In the Yellow Wallpaper, the narrator's longing to be outside as she looks out the window also mirrors Elizabeth's appreciation of the outdoor gardens of Pemberly through its windows. The narrator mentions 'those mysterious deep shaded arbours', 'the riotous old-fashioned flowers' and the 'gnarly trees', all quite wild and undomesticated descriptions of the flora. This could be a way of Austen and Charlotte Perkins-Gilman portraying how nature is only beautiful when it is left to grow untamed in its natural state rather than trimmed to perfection; on a more allegorical level how women should be given sufficient rights to be able to make the most out of life and reach their potential. The way in which every aspect of the setting of Hunsford is described as merely fitting and neat could also be essential to portraying the fact that the marriage of Mr Collins and Charlotte Lucas is simply appropriate. ...read more.

Conclusion

of showing how women were inferior in their control over their setting, and how their job was to stay indoors and do the housework; a much more passive job. In conclusion, the depiction of realistic settings in both Pride and Prejudice and The Yellow Wallpaper is undoubtedly important, but it is more the allegorical sense in which they are described that is essential in the success of Pride and Prejudice. The depiction of marriage and society through the terms used by Austen to describe the setting is ultimately the way in which we see how the perfect marriage must be. The way in which the setting portrays the characters' view on life also shows how conforming to the way in which society works simply in order to be financially secure will not allow you to live life to its full potential, what the narrator in The Yellow Wallpaper was exploring, pushing the boundaries of her own mental stability in doing so. A truly fulfilling marriage, it appears in Pride and Prejudice, can only exist between partners of whom both have mature and developed characters, as Darcy and Elizabeth have. The slow process of learning the truth about the other is not just a matter of removing prejudice but also of replacing it with a positive appreciation, as is signified by descriptions of setting that are not necessarily one hundred per cent accurate, but do reflect the characters' attitudes towards society, marriage and each other. ...read more.

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