• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The enticing themes of human desires and dreams in the city acts as a vessel for the American Dream, reinforcing its slow emergence into reality. This is demonstrated in both Toni Morrisons Jazz and Arthur Millers A View from the Brid

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

English Coursework A2 The enticing themes of "human desires and dreams" in the city acts as a vessel for the American Dream, reinforcing its slow emergence into reality. This is demonstrated in both Toni Morrison's "Jazz" and Arthur Miller's "A View from the Bridge" by using the city as a focal place of "possibility, success and threat", contributing to the assertion and erosion of the American Dream. In this way, the American life can either be fulfilled by the prosperity and opportunities it brings or shattered by the falsity of its ethos. The protagonists in "Jazz" are Joe and Violet; both of whom have experienced the gradual transformation of the city, which has become the central point in the American society, and compels them into uncertainty. In "A View from the Bridge", Eddie plays the role as the Invidia; where in roman mythology suggests a sense of envy and jealousy. The emotional experience of the Invidia might also be passive; the odium that is incurred in others results the catastrophe experienced at the end of the pivotal scene. He refuses to let go of his niece Catherine of which he has incestuous desires for, and becomes the "animal" resulting him being alienated from American society. Evidently, the "human desires and dreams" within the city is asserted or obliterated through the collective society as a whole, where only the submissive characters are allowed to continue and live on. Yet, all these fundamental features that make the city are under pressure, threatening the stability of absolute awareness presented outside this ethos. The Jazz Age began in the early 1920's and was a pivotal of profound social changes. This era was a defining moment as the people in those times had forsaken their previous traditional standards of living and searched for a new way of eloquence and insurgence. The rebellion of jazz music incorporates an element of "sin in syncopation"1 which declares to pursue a since of evil influence. ...read more.

Middle

However her identity moves into the light, where later in the novel, she searches for peace and longs to heal herself and her marriage, by taking ownership of her happiness and refuses to be a victim. Violets character is an engineered example of "possibility, success and threat" where the city offers a second chance, an American Dream - an American life that can be fulfilled by the opportunities it brings. Violet's turning point and realisation just goes to show that the city is not all bad. By applying the concept of Janus into both contexts, I believe that Joe's account had started off deficiently, where he immediately became the murderer, as he was "the one who shot the girl. 15" However, the narrator skilfully eradicates the reader's bad perception of Joe, and counteracts them with other characters accounts, and we immediately start to sympathise for him, as we realise how much pain he has gone through. For example, Dorcas's aunt realised "that the man who killed her nice cried all day and for him and for Violet that is as bad as jail. 16" The aunt empathizes for Joe, as he is feels imprisoned and mourns all day at the dead girl that he once used to love. Controversially, Eddie's character is deceitful; his initial impression upon the audience is one of complete self-confidence and control with an aura of intellectual arrogance, as he is successfully able to manipulate the American society. Eddie's jealousy is his driven motivation, fuel and strength, and he allows this emotion to plot against those whom he hates. The city ultimately serves as a setting to the development of Trace's new self as he is "caught midway between was and must be17". However it can only provide a carefully conquered and redefined freedom. The city has been developed into both a friend and foe. In 1926, the black neighbourhood within Manhattan has become the capital of black America. ...read more.

Conclusion

The image of Violet's birds is essential; it symbolises the migration and adapting to a new environment where essentially freedom is lost as a result of being lost in the city. Similarly, the establishment of Marco and Rodolpho's chance of a better life is swallowed up by the American Dream consequently creating conflict between two different societies and resulting to the death of Eddie. The city focuses on the human desires and dreams, a place of possibility, success and threat; however the falsity of the American Dream and all these fundamental features that make the city are under pressure, threatening the stability of absolute awareness presented outside this ethos. 1 "Does Jazz Put the Sin in Syncopation?" - Anne Shaw (Published in Ladies Home Journal, August 1921, pp 16-34) 2 "Does Jazz Put the Sin in Syncopation?" - Anne Shaw (Published in Ladies Home Journal, August 1921, pp 16-34) 3 "Does Jazz Put the Sin in Syncopation?" - Anne Shaw (Published in Ladies Home Journal, August 1921, pp 16-34) 4 Jazz by Toni Morrison Word Count: 613 5 A View from a Bridge - Page 38 6 A View from a Bridge - Page 37 7 Jazz by Toni Morrison 8 Jazz by Toni Morrison (120) 9 Jazz by Toni Morrison 10 Jazz by Toni Morrison 11 Jazz by Toni Morrison 12 Jazz by Toni Morrison 13 Jazz by Toni Morrison (33) 14 Jazz by Toni Morrison (220) Word Count: 671 15 Jazz by Toni Morrison 16 Jazz by Toni Morrison 17 Jazz by Toni Morrison (226) 18 Jazz by Toni Morrison (7) 19 American Dream Statement (In Congress, July 4, 1776) 20 Wikepidea Word Count: 636 21 A View from a Bridge 22 Here is New York, E. B White 23 A View from a Bridge (61) 24 Psychoanalytical Theory Wikipedia 25 Psychoanalytical Theory Wikipedia 26 A View from a Bridge 27 A View from a Bridge Word Count: 622 28 Ragtime 29 Ragtime 30 http://www.lexycle.com/courses/WLIT1/marxcrit.html 31 http://www.lexycle.com/courses/WLIT1/marxcrit.html 32 Karl Marx, "Theses on Feuerbach, III" Word Count: 452 ?? ?? ?? ?? Heelen Shah 22-BD ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other Criticism & Comparison section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other Criticism & Comparison essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The English Patient

    5 star(s)

    Though polite and genteel, Katharine nevertheless takes what she wants, assertively approaching Alm�sy and telling him that she wants him to "ravish her." Though Geoffrey is a devoted and kind husband, Katharine never seems remorseful about her extramarital affair. We see Katharine's wild, dark side in her affair with Alm�sy,

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Both A Passage to India and Heart of Darkness can be interpreted as portraying ...

    4 star(s)

    black slaves being made to perform meaningless hard-labour tasks such as digging holes and describing the physical state of their bodies in disturbingly graphic detail; Marlowe the narrator can see "every rib". In Forster's novel however perhaps the most shocking incident is the alleged assault of Adela which probably didn't even happen.

  1. Compare the Role of Magic and the Supernatural in The Tempest and A Midsummer ...

    People were often mistaken for fairies because the size of a fairy was thought to be that of a short human, so there would be no noticeable difference in physical size "People were often mistaken for fairies because the size of a fairy was thought to be that of a

  2. How do Arthur Miller and Tenessee Williams explore the blurring of reality and fantasy ...

    This then promotes a questionable argument to the reader as to whether Joe Keller was indeed at fault highly, and is truly dependent upon whether he should have considered the soldiers to also be his family and if his duty to wider society is just as important as his family by blood.

  1. Wilde and Shaw

    The characters created by Shaw are typical intellectuals and are identified with certain aspects of society. His plays deal with contemporary issues, for example in Pygmalion he deals with women's equality.

  2. Explore how 'Captain Corelli's Mandolin' and 'Never Let Me Go' present the effects of ...

    The switch to first person narrative for this chapter accentuates further the pompous megalomania of 'the Duce', leading the reader to question how the fate and livelihoods of so many innocent people could be allowed to rest in his hands at all.

  1. Compare the ways in which Larkin and Duffy present the reality of love.

    The constant failings present in love are especially shown in the closing line of the poem; ?It had not done so then and could not now?, with the juxtaposition of the past and the present in ?then? and ?now? emphasising the inability of love to deliver on its promises, as

  2. Control, submission and rebellion in the novels The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood, Memoirs ...

    citizen?s trust in Nosefire and let the citizens know that Nosefire has everything under control. Pun intended. Another way in which Nosefire keeps control over the society is through offering the idea of hope to the citizens. Nosefire created a secret propaganda where in the generated a virus that caused thousands of people to die.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work