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The Importance of Scene 5 in context with the whole play - "Now Faustus, must thou be damned, And canst thou be saved"

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Introduction

The Importance of Scene 5 in context with the whole play "Now Faustus, must thou be damned, And canst thou be saved" Scene 1 These are the words that open scene five as Faustus says them whilst sitting in his study. He is pondering on the like-hood of damnation. This scene has a repetitive sequence with a few phases. This is also the first time that we see Faustus expressing doubt as written in the above quote. This is one of the phases. He also becomes more resolute as he calls on the devil Memphostophilis. Persuasion is the second as persuasive efforts are made by the Good and Evil Angels to influence him. ...read more.

Middle

Faustus himself is dominated by two main character traits; intellect and ambition. It's his intellect that creates doubt when his ambition alone can carry on forward, but on the other side; it's also his intellect that makes his ambition possible in the first place. In addition, it is the most important scene because it is the crucial point when Faustus signs away his own soul to the Devil in exchange for twenty four years of rapture and bliss. It is the most important scene because this is the first time the two Angels appear who seem to echo Faustus' own thoughts. Faustus' ambition gives him the courage to sign away his soul for all the knowledge and wealth in the world, but ...read more.

Conclusion

This scene also develops our understanding of Memphostophilis as a character. He says earlier that hell is all around us and that it's everywhere that the Devils are. "Why this is hell, nor am I out of it" Scene 3 This echoes in scene five as I think that statement refers also to Faustus. Even though he looks like a respectable Christian man, on the inside, he is mesmerised by necromancy and has devilish desires. This suggests how Hell is around us, without us knowing it, and devils, as well as devil worshipers, are also amongst us. Overall, by all the distractions of the Deadly Sins, I think scene 5 offers the audience a satirical vision of themselves as resembling Faustus in their worldly pursuits. ...read more.

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