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The Other Side of the Mountain - A 'get away' can be appreciated from The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver in which the main character experiences a change, a change in her way of thinking.

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Introduction

The Other Side of the Mountain A 'get away' can be appreciated from The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver in which the main character experiences a change, a change in her way of thinking. The passage serves to present a theme about the upcoming events in the book. It does so by describing the changes that the author lives through, her reactions to it, and even unexpected surprises encountered during her 'rebirth' stage that gives the reader hints or clues leading to the upcoming. The reader is able to apperceive the protagonist's mind because of the author's simple fashion of writing, and its relatively easy comprehensibility. At the beginning, she adopts a new name as she adopts a new perspective on the world, broadening out from her rural Kentucky background to a larger view of life. She realizes a name's importance by reflecting that we receive it, and we do not choose it (line 6-7), but admits she had influence in choosing her new name. ...read more.

Middle

I wonder what her mom called her... In addition to her relationship with her mom, we can infer that the name giving exists from an admiration towards her, an admiration to her adult thinking in contrast to her na�vet�, previously explained. All this thinking about her mom 'refuels' her, for an unknown upcoming event (foreshadowing). She presents the Cherokee land as being godless. "The Cherokees believed God was in the trees"(line56), and then she explains the landscape: "From what I could see, there was not one tree in the entire state of Oklahoma" (line 59). This statement shows the character's beliefs toward religion, or perhaps homeland. An interpretation could be made from the fact that she perceives her own family's past as being archaic, something that does not influence her and her new persona. "From what I could see..." (line 59) cues us that she has a limited perspective and "could never see too far" (line 32). ...read more.

Conclusion

In addition, on line 25-26, she uses metonym and metaphor to establish the relationship between the car and the supposed-wheels 'running'. Used in line 31, is antithesis that serves to emphasize Oklahoma's flatness. Along with those mentioned, she also makes use of diction (Southern slangy). Nevertheless, perhaps one of the most prominent literary resources used is irony. The author used irony at the end, when she abruptly stated that there was no God in Oklahoma, when the reader was expecting all, but the opposite, based on the context. The inevitable advancing course of time that turns people from children to adults, and from adults to elders, is an undying theme. In this text, the character decides to run away and attempts to make a 'rebirth'. One cannot deny that everyone, at one time, desires to 'get away' and wishes to 'go past those mountains' even if it means changing our name. Word Count: 997 1 ...read more.

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