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The play Cosi, written by Louis Nowra, supports the assumption that certain members of society find it hard to deal with mentally ill people

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Introduction

?Cosi demonstrates that most of our attitudes to mental illness are based in ignorance.? Do you agree? The play Cosi, written by Louis Nowra, supports the assumption that certain members of society find it hard to deal with mentally ill people . Through Cosi, Nowra criticise the members of society who believe that institutions are the best place for people who have developed or have been born with some form of mental illness. The play explores the lack of understanding people had on mental illness during the ?anti ? psychiatry? movement that occurred in the same period as the war. The play also makes it clear to audience that some considered there to be a division in society, as certain members had developed an ?us and them ?mentality between the ?sane? and the supposedly ?insane?. On the other hand, Cosi also aims to demonstrate the knowledge that can be gained when people approach the illness with an open mind and take the time to get to know the patients. As this could would give them a clearly understanding of the mentally ill and be more accepting of them, to recognise that we are all human. ...read more.

Middle

This clearly demonstrates attitudes of ignorance towards the mentally ill because Zac actually has a drug addiction and not an illness. Therefore instead of the institution trying to help him overcome his addiction they are just catering for his deadly habit. Nowra?s comic play portrays a range of dilemmas in the treatment of mental illness and certain necessary extremes that were The Play makes it clear that an ?us and them? mentality has be created by the ?sane? members of society to categories them as different to the ?insane?. Nowra makes it clear that society sees particular kinds of ?differences? in others as threatening and therefore in order to cope with this fear they label the individual. University educated characters, Nick and Lucy, share this same mentality as they are both insensitive towards the patients, labelling them and treating them as ?crazy? people. Nick shows no shame, as he openly signs ?they are coming to take me away, ha, ha, to the funny farm? whilst in hearing distance of the patients. This makes it clear that he sees himself above the patients and therefore shows them no respect. ...read more.

Conclusion

Lewis grow to feel comfortable around the patients telling Julie ?my (his) grandmother went mad? and that in a way being in the asylum was testing him because ?I (he) liked my (his grandmother? and recognises that ?she had gone mad, she was still my (his) grandmother?. This demonstrates Lewis ability to discard the primary attitudes of ignorance towards mental illness and instead understand that they are also humans who have ?extraordinary ?personalities. Lewis?s approach to dealing with the patients was learnt through actually interacting and levelling with the patients, rather than assuming what is best for the patients. Lewis discovers that through contribution ?it makes them feel a part of the show?. Furthermore, make them feel as though they have some sort of power over their own lives. Cosi, shows the audience that once people actually take the time to associate themselves with institutionalised patients they learn to see them beyond the illness and recognise their important values. Cosi was just another one of his projects that were aimed to occupy the patients, a way for him to try and fix them? Very close minded when attempting to ?cure the ill. Understand all human, however the mentally ill are just people who have extraordinary thought?s and experiences. ...read more.

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