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The poems that I will discuss, are 'Charge of the Light Brigade' by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and 'Dulce Et Decorum' by Wilfred Owen. Wilfred Owen was actually a fighter in the war, where as Alfred, Lord Tennyson

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Introduction

A Comparison of Two Poems In this essay I will compare two poems. The poems that I will discuss, are 'Charge of the Light Brigade' by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and 'Dulce Et Decorum' by Wilfred Owen. Wilfred Owen was actually a fighter in the war, where as Alfred, Lord Tennyson only wrote the poem on what he had heard and he had no experience of war. Although both poems are about war, they are a complete contrast to each other, not only in the way they are written but also with the message they deliver. 'Charge of the Light Brigade' delivers a strong message. The theme of this poem is war. The poem gives us the impression that war is glorious and noble. The poem consists of phrases such as 'When can their glory fade?' 'Honour the charge they made', 'The noble six hundred'. This shows that in Alfred, Lord Tennyson's eye, it is noble and glorious to fight and die for your country. The message that 'Dulce Et Decorum' delivers is very different. Again the theme of this poem is war, but it tells us of the disaster, chaos and truth of war. The poem ends with a very clear message: My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori 'Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori' is Latin and it means it is sweet and fitting to die for one's country. ...read more.

Middle

The stanza goes on to tell us about the how the men continued with determination even though they were in pain and tired. Stanza two tells about them being gassed. It is dramatic and gives a clear picture on the men fumbling around trying to protect themselves. Stanza three tells us about a man which had unfortunately been attacked by the gas, 'He plunges at me, guttering, chocking, drowning.'. The use of alliteration and onomatopoeia causes us to see the pain and struggle that man must be going through. Stanza four is the poet telling the audience his thought of war and how it is a horrible experience. Wilfred Owen uses a lot of similes so that everyone can relate war to sufferings they know of. Therefore expressing clearly the chaos and suffering that is war. It is not only the words that express the poet's thoughts and feelings. The way the poem looks also has a large effect. 'Charge of the Light Brigade' is written in neat stanzas. This represents the horses in a tight formation heading to war. When the fight is occurring, in stanza four, the stanza becomes slightly untidy. This untidy stanza has a good effect as it represents the mess of the fight. The structure of 'Dulce Et Decorum' seems neat and tidy, but when read aloud the punctuation changes that. Where the punctuation is in the middle of lines and not at the end, like expected, the poem does not sound as neat and tidy as it looks. ...read more.

Conclusion

This great use of similes is very effective in this poem as the poet can explain to everyone exactly what war is like and he does this by comparison he wrote like this as his poem is targeted at everyone so that they can all see and understand what war is actually like. The message delivered from 'Charge of the Light Brigade' is that war does have its downside but to die for your country is noble and if you die for your country you're a hero and you should be honoured. When can their glory fade? O the wild charge they made! All the world wondered. Honor the charge they made, Honor the Light Brigade, Noble six hundred. The message that 'Dulce Et Decorum' delivers is a complete contrast. It tells the reader that war is chaos, pain and is not worth a life. Wilfred Owen makes his point at the end of the poem in which he says 'My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori' Which is Latin for 'It is sweet and meet (fitting) to die for one's country.' This is a powerful end to such a powerful poem not only does it express the point of the whole poem but it also addresses the reader as 'My friend' making it feel more direct and personal. Michaela Scott. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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