• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The presentation of nature in Robert Frost's poetry

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The presentation of nature in Robert Frost's poetry Many of Robert Frost's poems contain the vital ingredient of 'nature'. Frost uses nature as a metaphor, primarily, in his poems to express the intentions of his poems. He uses nature as a background metaphor in which he usually begins a poem with an observation of something in nature and then moves towards a connection to some human situation. He uses rural landscapes, homely farmers and the natural world to illustrate this human psychological struggle with everyday situations that we seem to experience. Frost uses blank verse in "The Wood-Pile" by using an iambic pentameter. This is very typical of Frost in his nature poetry. We get this use of iambic pentameter in "Mending Wall" and "After Apple-Picking". In "The Wood-Pile", some lines are blank verse, "To warm the frozen swamp as best it could" However, other lines present more stress and great irregularity, as in line 26, with its six stresses and spondaic emphasis on this year's snow, "No runner tracks in this year's snow looped near it." In "The Wood-Pile", the speaker sees a bird, which eventually leads him to the wood-pile. ...read more.

Middle

"The Wood-Pile" is appealing, but the point Frost is trying to make could be perhaps speaking of human effort and what it comes to or hinting at despair. But the last two lines are warming and carves itself into the poem permanently, perhaps ending the poem with a sense of hope, in that the wood decays, generating heat, which makes it have some uses, even though it has been abandoned and left to rot, yet it is a hopeless task all the same. In "The Wood-Pile", there was 'hard snow', which held the speaker back from going any further, but the speaker persists on, but to only get lost. This leads the speaker to the woodpile to a revelation of human effort, despair and decay, here is an example where Frost uses nature as a barrier in his poems, but in a worthwhile way. Another example of this is in the poem, "Mending Wall". We have two men meeting only in terms of civility and neighbourliness to build a barrier between them. They do so out of habit and tradition. ...read more.

Conclusion

In "After Apple-picking", Frost deliberately leaves us in ambiguity, with the mystery of the rhymes, as when and how often they come. As there is no set rhyme scheme, this keeps words and sounds active to keep the reader on their toes. The poem could metaphorically suggest that it is about the efforts of writing poetry. The 'cider-apple heap' then makes a good metaphor for saved and recycled bits of poetry. The interpretation of 'sleep' could be the 'Final sleep' as the sleep of Woodchuck is the sleep of winter, which metaphorically, in the language of seasons, has strong associations with death. In general, nature is described with affection, yet none of the nature poems are free from hints of possible danger. However, Frost, when using nature, in his descriptions, is convincingly real. One can picture the situation; perhaps even feel the 'warmth' of the fire in "The Wood-Pile". Whichever way you see it, it is evident that nature plays an important role in Frost's poetry and "The Wood-pile" proves this and is a typical example of many of his other poems involving nature, with its blank verse that Frost has created to be his own using his symbolic language to make the poems more speech-like. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Robert Frost section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Robert Frost essays

  1. The Relationship Between Man and Nature in the poems of Robert Frost and R.S. ...

    "Something there is that doesn't love a wall." It's only the hunters trying to find their rabbit. How many dogs must have died from rocks falling on them? They should be nice to the dogs, and the rabbits, by putting up a proper wall, one that won't fall down.

  2. Poets often use nature imagery to comment on the relationship between humans and the ...

    Then he flung outwared, feet first, with a swish, Kicking his way down through the air to the ground. (Frost 411) The beauty of nature in "Birches" is associated youth; thus, the speaker reflects on a time in his past when he was once "a swinger of birches" (411).

  1. Post-1914 Poetry

    This, too, he does "with total concentration", waiting for someone to ask "what you doing?" but no one does. Towards the end of the poem, Mick Gower adds: "Anyone can see he didn't want to play that game" in a sarcastic manner, and states that he has "plenty better things to do", although this is not true either.

  2. Commentarty: Mending Wall by Robert Frost

    The line "To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean", refers back to the gaps in the wall that were last mentioned in line 4: "And makes gaps even two can pass abreast". This shows Frost amplifying his thoughts on the gaps for emphasis. Frost uses line 10 to create a sinister mystery with who or what makes the gaps in the wall.

  1. Robert Frost Selected Poems - 'The Road Not Taken' and 'Stopping By Woods On ...

    In stanza 3, the man has still not moved on and his horse is becoming more and more confused as to where they are. He "gives his harness bells a shake/To ask if there is some mistake". The horse keeps hurrying Frost by shaking his bells, upsetting the narrator's thoughts and short break.

  2. Write a critical appreciation of Robert Frost's 'The Wood Pile', noting to what extent ...

    Frost finally realizes the purpose of the woodpile. At the same time, Frost's own ideas of how a woodpile should be used are defeated by its apparent ecological function.

  1. Analyse The Woodpile and compare the language and themes to other Frosts poems.

    see this from the image of the wood decaying, "slow smokeless burning of decay". Frost also talks about the uselessness of the woodpile if it is left there "leave it there far from a useful fire place". The words decay and useless mean the same thing as waste and wastefulness,

  2. Emotional Barriers in Robert Frost's Mending wall and Home burial".

    She is clearly much more emotional than her husband, and though undoubtedly saddened by the death, he keeps it to himself and does not show any emotion towards his wife. When the husband then tried to talk with his wife she stops him from talking about her son and also attempts to leave the house.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work