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The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

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Introduction

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that, the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference. Analysis on Road Not Taken This poem, The Road Not Taken, by Robert Frost is magnificently written, including numerous metaphors, which all center around an extended metaphor. ...read more.

Middle

It is limited how much the author sees and understands as to what result will come from making choice A otherwise called the first road. He examined the second road, and thought it would be more exciting, because he felt this was the less traveled road, and described it as "having perhaps the better claim, because it was grassy and wanted wear." "Grassy and wanted wear" is a metaphor. It is saying this one choice in life appeared to be less common, and therefore caught the author's eye, as though it was inviting him to make this choice. Later on, it becomes clear that both roads were equally common because of the metaphor "Both that morning equally lay in leaves no step had trodden black." The leaves represent opportunities in the choice. This line is saying that both of the choices had few people experience them and take advantage of the opportunities. Therefore, the two choices were equal, there was not one that was less taken. The author reuses the line "two roads diverged into a wood," as one of the last, which is the same extended metaphor for choices in life as previously used, however has purposely left out the word "yellow." ...read more.

Conclusion

So, he vowed to himself to experience the first choice as well, saying, "oh I kept the first for another day." This vow is apparently impossible to fulfill because each choice requires time and is irreversible, which is clear in the line, "knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back." Frost then shows regret and remorse when it has become clear that he could have chosen the other option, but will now not be able to do so, and he envisions himself telling his life story in the future, and is not satisfied with what he accomplished in life, because he says, "I shall be telling this with a sigh somewhere ages and ages hence." As well, the title of this poem is the road not taken, not the road less taken. This title selection tells us that Frost realizes that there was no road less taken, and regrets not experiencing the other choice. He is unhappy with the unknown. Therefore we learn that we must be careful in choosing our decisions, so that we are satisfied and content with the person we have become, realizing that the decisions we made were 100% not "perhaps" the better option. ...read more.

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