• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Role of Drama in Primary English teaching

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The Role of Drama in Primary English teaching The teaching of oral language is particularly important. Communication skills have numerous applications including supporting the development of reading and writing and fostering emotional and social maturity. The QCA document discusses four aspects of speaking and listening; speaking, listening, group discussion and interaction and drama. Experience in drama helps children understand language beyond how it is written: how voice and gesture are used to communicate the sense of what is being said and how to adapt their speech or writing to suit different audiences. Drama is a rich context for children to experiment with language and feel involved in the narrative. Appendix 1 gives a detailed lesson plan for use with Year 2 term 1. For children learning English, drama is a powerful tool. It enables them to be actively involved in constructing a performance and promotes discussion in groups. Teaching in this area should extend and promote children's talk in the classroom so there is a clear and smooth progression in speaking and listening across the key stages. ...read more.

Middle

Teachers should recognise the individual differences in EAL children and assess how competent they are in all languages they speak. The teacher then will have a picture of that child along a language continuum and will be able to use the skills the child has in their home language to help them towards English fluency. The bilingual child has many advantages over the others; they will have an insight in the systems behind language and will come to a meta-linguistic understanding that their peers may not have. Community links are very important in EAL teaching. Parents and members of the community can be involved in a number of ways, including writing first language versions of stories used in the classroom, bringing in written material in the first language, telling stories to the class in first language whilst the teacher reads the English version or making traditional food for the class. The lesson plan presumes that the EAL children have an early grasp of English and uses strategies to improve their confidence in spoken English. ...read more.

Conclusion

In year five this is further extended so children can use working in role to explore complex issues in different social, cultural or historical perspectives. By year six the use of role play has developed into a way of investigating key moments in a story, such as using the decision alley strategy, to explore a characters thoughts, hopes, fears and desires. Drama progresses steadily in the QCA guidance, introducing language features gradually and using previous knowledge to build new concepts. Drama is a particularly important means to increase children's speaking and listening skills. It is fun and allows children to invest in the story and consider how the character feels. There are very specific language features to teach and assess in drama, such as use of voice and gesture and how the child is able to explore their character in role. Drama can be a powerful tool for EAL children as it allows them to collaborate with their peers and take risk in the new language. When teaching drama, teachers should be aware that progression is steady and builds on previous experience. If too high an expectation is made of them the children may lose confidence, but equally if not challenged they may lose their enthusiasm for drama. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Investigating how language has changed in children's literature; in relation to interaction between ...

    5 star(s)

    "Sit down both of you, and tell me exactly what took place." [....] After reading the note she said quietly, "Well, I gather you both behaved in a very sensible and proper manner, and I am glad you kept your heads and knew what to do in a case of emergency.

  2. Act 3 scene 3 is a pivotal scene in the play Othello. How does ...

    Another technique Iago uses to warn Othello is jealousy. ?Oh beware, my lord, of Jealousy, It is the green-eyed Monster which doth mock the meat it feeds on?. Whilst pretending to maintain his integrity by not telling Othello, Iago now releases monster.

  1. How does Arthur Miller use the character of Eddie to build tension in his ...

    "This one's name was Eddie Carbone..." The audience are interested to find out why Eddie is introduced at the end of the Alfieri's speech, and it creates a sense of intrigue. "This one's name" tell us that what is about to happen, can happen to anyone.

  2. An investigation into the similarities and differences between written social interactions through the new ...

    safe, From Student A. In order to achieve a clear and successful analysis of these texts, I propose to employ a method of analysis whereby a four-way comparison can be made. It is indispensable to dissect the linguistic features of these texts so that one may closely examine and scrutinize; a)

  1. Creative writing and commentary. It was the year 2015 and Earth was exploring ...

    Michael standing there, when he saw her he put his arms out ready to hold her, she went over to him and gave him a hug. Michael said to Rachel "Are you ok my love?" Rachel cried to him "They're all dead Uncle Mike" Rachel and Ramani looked at each

  2. How does J.D Salinger explore the fall of innocence in "The Catcher In The ...

    Stevenson commented that the novel was written about a "boys attempt to recapture his identity". Holden's warped understanding of childhood and adulthood spiral out of control in his mind and allows him to feel justified in pulling himself away from the world by creating a protective layer of cynicism.

  1. Centre Stage

    At eighteen, he was a year older than Isobelle and a lot more disreputable. At the market place, Isobelle's dismissive banter toward him once angered him. He liked what he saw and wanted what he liked. He was seen to suddenly grab Isobelle's arm roughly and pull her towards him.

  2. The Dutch Attack on Landguard Fort - 2nd July 1667

    After the long march when the Dutch troops saw the fort was undamaged they must have felt extremely disappointed as they knew they will lose many men in the battle. The Dutch also knew they were likely to encounter the white regiment on the way back to the ships.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work