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The runaway slave named Jim teaches an ignorant and innocent white boy named Huck Finn life lessons through their adventures down the Mississippi River on a raft, proving he is the best parental figure for Huck

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Introduction

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Thesis statement: The runaway slave named Jim teaches an ignorant and innocent white boy named Huck Finn life lessons through their adventures down the Mississippi River on a raft, proving he is the best parental figure for Huck. The story about a boy named Huck in search for a family and a place he can call home. Through his adventures, Huck finds happiness and love when he is befriended with a slave named Jim. It is through Jim that Huck realizes that color of skin does not make a man and that Jim is the father figure he had been searching for. On Jackson's Island Page 41 "I was ever so happy to see Jim. I wasn't lonesome now". This is the first time Huck is beginning to realize his friendship with Jim. Page 45 "Some young birds come along, flying a yard or two at a time and lighting. Jim said it was a sign it was going to rain." Jim knowed all kinds of signs". On Jackson's Island Examples of Jim being a father figure to Huck: When Huck and Jim come upon a floating house in ...read more.

Middle

Page 64 " so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry." Huck in the canoe and Jim in the raft: When they get separated in the fog on the river, Jim expresses his parental feelings for Huck when they are reunited. Page 83 "Goodness gracious, is dat you, Huck? En you ain' dead-you ain' drownded-you's back ag'in? It's too good for true, honey, it's too good for true. Lemme look at you chile, lemme feel o' you. No, you ain' dead! you's back ag'in,' live en soun', jis de same old Huck-de same ole Huck, thanks to goodness!" Huck says Jim must have been drinking or something to think he had been gone. He played a mean trick on him and realizes how he feels about Jim and how mean he was to Jim. Page 86 "It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger; but I done it, and I warn't ever sorry for it afterward, neither. ...read more.

Conclusion

me, and do everything he could think of foe me, and how good he always was; and at last I struck the time I saved him by telling the men we had smallpox aboard, and he was so grateful, and said I was the best friend old Jim ever had in the world, and the only one he's got now;"..."All right, then, I'll go to hell" and tore it up." Huck's statement of Jim's equality; Page 275 "I knowed he was white inside, and I reckoned he'd say what he did say-so it was alright, now." This proves that all people are the same color inside and that Huck found a father in Jim, that the color of the skin does not make a man. Conclusion: In searching for a family and a place he can call home, Huck finds happiness and love when he is befriended by the runaway slave Jim as they explore and endure their adventures on a raft down the Mississippi River. Jim finds freedom as he teaches Huck life lessons and they both find freedom from society's prejudices because they love each other as a father and son would. ...read more.

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