• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The social, cultural and economic influences on the learning and use of language

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

(1,512 words) The social, cultural and economic influences on the learning and use of language Introduction It is estimated that approximately one in five adults have low literacy skills. Low levels of literacy have been linked to poor acquisition of language skills at an early age and this in turn has been directly linked to social exclusion. This study will start by looking at the context in which we use language and how this shapes what we say and how we say it. It will also look at dialect and accent and examine their relationship with society. This raises questions about 'Standard English' and how attitudes to this have developed over time. The study will conclude by examining the direct link between poor literacy/language skills and social exclusion and how this impacts on society both in terms of the individual and the economy as a whole. The importance of context in language use The situation in which we find ourselves, who we are with, where we are, what we have to say and how we have to say it are all massive influences on our spoken and written language. ...read more.

Middle

In spoken form it is used in formal situations such as business negotiations, public announcements and news broadcasts. In written form it is used in such formal documents as essays, business letters, notices, reports and memos. In Britain, the prestige accent associated with Standard English is Received Pronunciation and all forms of slang, dialect and grammatical deviation have historically been regarded as non-standard. The notion of Received Pronunciation sometimes still persists as though there is some kind of standard we should aspire to and that any variations from this standard are in some way inferior. Whilst most educated writers use Standard English in all texts, more liberal attitudes have evolved with regard to spoken language. In a multi-cultural society, non-standard accents and word forms are increasingly acceptable and the concepts of Standard English and Received Pronunciation as standards of correctness have become less important. Standard English itself is now considered to be a dialect of English equal with regional accents. For example, it is fairly common for a speaker to use Standard English and deliver it with a regional accent. Crystal (1995) notes that although we have no problem enjoying dialect literature and laughing at dialect jokes, at the same time we still make harshly critical judgements about ways of speaking that are not the same as our own. ...read more.

Conclusion

Conclusion There are many influences on an individual's language. The social situation and the 'appropriateness' of language determine not only what we have to say but, just as importantly, how we say it. Accent and dialect reveal something about an individual and can be linked to regional, social or personal circumstances. Although historically 'Standard English' and 'Received Pronunciation' have been regarded as socially superior, this is now becoming less so. 'Standard English' is still important, however, as it is the written form most appropriately accepted in formal documents. Research has been done to support the notion that the primary carer/child relationship has a crucial influence on the language attainment of a child and that this attainment will have a huge impact on the learning of the individual more widely. People at risk of social exclusion and its associated problems of low income, ill health and unemployment are far more likely to have low language/literacy skills. Moreover, lack of basic skills is a major barrier to employment, training or progression at work and if we are to compete on a global level, we need to have a highly skilled, adaptable workforce. The cost of failing to deal with the problem is significant - not just to the individual, but also to employers and the economy as a whole. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Language Aquisition Notes

    5 star(s)

    Through media, travel, politics, etc. o English has become a significant global language due to expansion of the British Empire, and, more recently, the significance that the USA have across the world. o English exists as many different varieties due to the influence of the native languages of the countries which adapt English into their culture.

  2. Peer reviewed

    Investigation into the Judgements of Slang

    4 star(s)

    Though research has mostly been conducted into Multi-cultural London English (MLE) this is just one example of MEYD that is spread across different areas in the country. MEYD derives from multicultural diversity in inner city areas. Increased immigration in cities has lead to various forms of English merging.

  1. Investigation into Gender Differences in the Language of Personal Profiles on Dating Websites

    The mean number for both men and women in the 20s category is just under 3, for the 40s category it is 4, and for the 60s category it is just under 6. A stereotypical idea about female language use is that women use more adjectives, more descriptive language and more small detail.

  2. An exploration of the extent in which childrens TV presenters accommodate to the participants ...

    In Beat the Boss the game rules are explained in a similar way to Best of Friends: "Three Bright Sparks compete against three Big Shots" The presenter uses a lot of alliteration and puns, such as "awesome aquatic amusement" and "Your brief is to create a brand-new pool play product that will create a splash with your mates!"

  1. An investigation into the similarities and differences between written social interactions through the new ...

    This critical style of writing creates much confusion when it is observed through linguistic lenses, since the linguist is unable to demarcate whether this form of transmission is spoken or written, because of the fact that the writing has actually been written as if it were spoken.

  2. How do Politicians gain support through language? AQA English coursework

    Kennedy uses interrogatives to a much different effect. He uses them; as the leader of the underdog party, to express what he believes people will be thinking, when contemplating voting for the Liberal Democrats. The simple interrogative sentence, "Are these people up for it?"

  1. How does Arthur Miller use the character of Eddie to build tension in his ...

    Besides he claims it is an honour for him to be able to help them. Catherine also has some news: she tells Eddie that she has been picked by her school's Principal, to work in a big plumbing company as a stenographer.

  2. With the use of specific examples, discuss the ways and means in which writers ...

    For some, canons are necessary to organize the past and to provide some form of standards; for others, they are unnecessarily conservative and rigid force stifling new and different forms of creativity. Therefore it is not unusual that new writers in their creativity often challenge the way the traditional canon

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work