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The solitary reaper

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Introduction

Wordsworth is depicting a girl at the fields reaping and singing alone, the sound of the girl is magnificient and it makes him to tell people recognise and 'listen!' her , it is underpinned that the poet does not even understand the content of the song, yet he is enchanted by it, and lastly it is indicated that this is a memory and the poet feds up with this memory to write the poem, one of the distinctive features of Wordsworth's verse. The poem is structured in four stanzas. The first imagines the poet listening 'the Solitary reaper' who is 'Highland lass' and tells people to notice her and not to disturb her, he commands them to listen her. ...read more.

Middle

The comparasion of her voice with Nightingale which is from 'Arabian sands' and cuckoo-bird from 'farthest Hebrides' suggests that around the song 'the solitary reaper' sings is universal like a birds voice, its suggesting that even people not able to understand the meaning of the sound, humans are the part of the nature too, therefore the sound of a girl is enchanting more than a bird's voice, cause its like a birds sound in a way and its more than it in other way, it has feelings in it which can be understandable by any other people without knowing the features of the language which she sings. ...read more.

Conclusion

The poem is written with iambic tetrameter, it intensifies the tone of admiration and enthusiasm. First and last stanza begins calmly, with the end-stopped and open lines suggesting that the poet is in control of his thoughts and feelings. However at the second and third stanza, it seems that this cannot be contained in open lines and must burst out into the following ones, culminating in an enthusiastic, joyful mindset to end lines with the enjambments suggest spurts of emotion . The praise for mountains and pastures, for nature, is the main subject of the poem, the effect of beauty and memory at the poet is also described at the last stanza therefore the theme of the poem is like other poets of Wordsworth, nature and human, and effect of these figures on human memory. ...read more.

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