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Through a close examination of two or three passages from Scoop and consideration of other examples of satire that you have read, explore how Scoop works as a satire.

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Introduction

Scoop: A Novel about Journalists Through a close examination of two or three passages from 'Scoop' and consideration of other examples of satire that you have read, explore how 'Scoop' works as a satire. 'Scoop', published in 1938, was one of Evelyn Waugh's earliest novels. In this novel Waugh presents a humorous and satirical view on Fleet Street journalists and their frenzied hunt of a scoop. Other novels, such as 'Gulliver's Travels' by Jonathan Swift and 'Animal Farm' by George Orwell, both portray satirical messages throughout. In 'Gulliver's Travels', Swift satirises human nature, and the political system and government. He uses Gulliver as a satirical device, and in order to portray the sarcasm and over-exaggeration of what Swift is satirising, he sends Gulliver on three journeys to strange lands, where he encounters odd people and thing, more tools that Swift uses. Gulliver's first journey takes him to the Land of Lilliput, where the local inhabitants of the land are six inch tall beings and he is a giant. His next journey brings him to Brobdingnag, where his situation is reversed, and he is a midget among giants. His third journey leads him to Laputa, a floating island which is inhabited by strange beings who derive their whole culture from music and mathematics. And finally Gulliver's fourth journey places him in the land of the Houyhnhnm, a society of intelligent, reasoning horses. ...read more.

Middle

In these few pages, Waugh satirises and exaggerates the disorganisation of journalism. He adds plenty of humour in these pages, especially how William Boot expects to be writing about 'great crested grebes' and 'badgers'. Even the names of places are exaggerated, like the 'Megalopolitan building'. When he is in Mr Salter's office, he asks Boot 'You don't happen to know where Reykjavik is?' and when Boot says that he doesn't, Mr Salter says 'Pity. I hoped you might. No one in the office does.' This is humorous, as it is a journalist office and usually assumed that journalists know places around the world due to all of their traveling and reporting. Boot says 'I expect you want to talk about the great crested grebe', and receives a reply saying 'Good God, no'. This shows how little communication everyone has. The second book that I am going to look at is 'Animal Farm', in which Orwell indirectly attacks the Russian Communism. Orwell uses humorous and effective techniques to attack on the events of the Russian Revolution and on the totalitarian regime in Russia. In the first chapter of the book, old Major, tells the animals about his dream. He says he dreams of a different life for the animals and encourages them to take action against the cruel owner of the Manor Farm, Mr Jones. ...read more.

Conclusion

There are more questions asked by Boot about journalism that portray the same incompetence and exaggerated lack of intelligence of journalists. Boot asks, 'What is U.N.?' This is very humorous, because any journalist would know of National News, as it is one of the biggest news agencies. The reply to this question from Corker is 'no kidding?' which comes from a more sensible and intelligent point of view, basically implying 'how are you are journalist if you don't know that the U.N. is?' Then, to make matters even worse, Boot asks 'and what, please, is a news agency?' This is another question that is mocking journalists and makes Boot out to be very new in journalism, but also unintelligent. With these humorous questions, Waugh satirises the intelligence of journalists, mocking them and what they do. It is very witty and Waugh uses very clever devices like the language and characterisation to show which journalists are more competent than others. So, throughout 'Scoop', Waugh uses very clever devices and techniques to retain the humour, but also mock and over-exaggerate journalists and their job. Satires range from a wide variety, as you saw with 'Animal Farm' and 'Gulliver's Travels', and each author manages to create his own ways of satirising what ever he wants. All in all, 'Scoop' is a humorous novel, in which Waugh successfully manages to satirise journalists and their overplayed jobs. ...read more.

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