• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent are beliefs, thoughts and knowledge restricted or helped by the language which can be used to express them?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

TOK: To what extent are beliefs, thoughts and knowledge restricted or helped by the language which can be used to express them? For: * If a person is really interested in something or someone they will have such passion for this thing that they will use as many positive and detailed descriptions. This can be due to people's thought processes and perhaps the individual is really keen on allowing someone else to get the full picture (understanding) of their idea that they will want it to be as accurate as possible. However, in some languages, such a thorough portrayal can be described by the use of only one word. For instance, in the Australian language, Pintupi, the word 'katara', is the hole that a goanna makes when it has broken the surface of its burrow after hibernation. ...read more.

Middle

E.g. American Indians, Hopi, were said to view the world in a much different way to others. They treated words such as 'lightning' and 'wave' only as verbs, whereas in English we use them as both a verb and a noun. This causes a much more confined speech and they consequently produce different, individual views. * A point that I would like to include is the idea that 'language dictates thought' and the notion that 'concepts are untranslatable'. This is obviously false as babies learn their first words through those processes. * Thought still depends some-what on language and this is illustrated through imagery and names given to certain things, which enhances our memory and clarity of them. ...read more.

Conclusion

* Another idea that proves that language is not responsible for completely determining thought is the reference to language. If we look at the French word 'les magazines' we can easily pick up the similarity that it shares to the English word 'magazines'. The ability for the French to borrow this language stresses the fact that language is independent on determining thought completely. * Languages differ not so much as to what can be said in them, but rather as to what it's relatively easy to say in them. * We are inventing new words all the time to describe new trends. * Blind people can be taught to read words through Braille despite not being able to ascribe these words to objects. Kendra J. Chisholm 12 BSCH February 18th, 2005 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Language: Context, Genre & Frameworks essays

  1. An exploration of the extent in which childrens TV presenters accommodate to the participants ...

    The Beat the Boss presenter tended to use formal lexis, but there was also a heavy use of "puns", for the audience benefit, which showed only a little accommodation between presenter and participants. The discrepant level of accommodation is influenced by the differing sub-genres of each show.

  2. Are truths obscured by the languages in which we express them? I find that ...

    For example we read 'Cat and Mouse'. Because I had an older version of the novel at home and a newer version of the book received from the school I could see that there are differences in the language. One reason for this is that two different translators translated it in two different times and this making many different phrases between the books.

  1. An examination of Shakespeare's use of colloquial language. Although we cannot be sure ...

    However, as there are many low life scenes in Shakespeare's other plays it can occur quite frequently if it is appropriate. For example in the tragedy Titus Andronicus, Aaron is perhaps one of the first Shakespearean characters to use deliberate colloquialisms.

  2. To what extent are beliefs, thoughts and knowledge restricted or helped by the language ...

    For instance, in the Australian language, Pintupi, the word 'katara', is the hole that a goanna makes when it has broken the surface of its burrow after hibernation. Here, we can see that it takes many words to reproduce the meaning that the Australians are able to summon in one sole word.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work