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To what extent did the conditions change between 1914 and 1918? The conditions for soldiers changed throughout the war

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Introduction

B: To what extent did the conditions change between 1914 and 1918? The conditions for soldiers changed throughout the war. The living conditions altered, as did the fighting conditions. At the beginning of the war in 1914, there weren't many different weapons available. Rifles, bayonets, machine guns, artillery pieces, etc, where available from the start of the war. As the war went on, many weapons got introduce to the soldiers and battlefields; which proved vital in the war. Gas was introduced. The main type of gas was chlorine; it slowly killed its victims, choking them to death. Despite the terrible effects of gas it wasn't very successful. It was hard to use (as the wind direction could blow it off course) and gas masks were made as protection. Methods of attacking with gas were improved. You could use shells to fire gas guns. ...read more.

Middle

Three new types of tanks were introduced; the Mark IV's, which carried more amour; the Whippet, which was lighter; and the most effective mark V which was more powerful and had better steering. In 1912, the British Army started the Royal Flying Corps. This group used the aeroplanes to survey large areas. This helped the war effort by observing the enemy's movements and finding the best places for artillery bombardments. The aeroplanes would have a pilot and an observer. By 1915, cameras were fitted so the observer could take aerial photographs and soon after, the aeroplanes were fitted with wireless, so they could report by Morse code. In 1917, there weren't any solo fighters; the British went up in squadrons to help to protect each other. Aeroplanes were also used for bombing, and were typically used for attacking the German bases. The Germans also used the Zeppelin; this was an airship for bombing civilian targets, but in 1916, it was replaced by Gotha aeroplane. ...read more.

Conclusion

Many families were spit up, and many deaths were grieved. However, this was all forgiven when the news came through of the victory of the war. Before the war, women had been losing their second-class citizen stereotype, and the war helped it. With all the men away, there was a shortage in labour, so, the women volunteered for the jobs. Their work was indispensable and they got more self-confidence, as they were now getting a wage. When the males returned to the UK, and were able to work again, many women kept their jobs as they were proved valuable for businesses. In conclusion, many things changed in Britain during the First World War, 1914 to 1918. More weapons were introduced and used, the air force was greatly improved, everyone's attitudes changed for the worse, and the women got a decent place in society. So, these things all helped lead to the defeat of Germany and the end of the First World War. ...read more.

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