• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

'Treasure Island is a 'rites of passage' novel that tells of Jim Hawkins' spiritual and psychological growth from child like innocence to an experienced, wise young man. The Theme of this novel is the development of the central character

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

GCSE English Treasure Island Coursework 'Treasure Island is a 'rites of passage' novel that tells of Jim Hawkins' spiritual and psychological growth from child like innocence to an experienced, wise young man. The Theme of this novel is the development of the central character Jim from childhood to maturity. Jim Hawkins is a curious, resilient and volatile boy. The writer portrays him as volatile through his spontaneous and often non-thinking approach to situations. The reader sees this when Jim jumps ashore with the pirates or runs off to capture the Hispaniola. The writer does this because it keeps the plot flowing, and adds a dimension of unpredictability. The condition of the time the writer is writing about demand Jim to be resilient in the face of it all. Enormous pressure is put on Jim early in the novel, when his father falls ill. Jim at a young age of probably twelve is now running the "Admiral Benbow". But at the time that this is being written about this is not unheard of. ...read more.

Middle

Jim often shows signs of great bravery, and it's that bravery in the face of the pirates in the Admiral Benbow that leads him to Long John Silver. Long John is incredibly charismatic, and immediately upon meeting Jim, starts playing psychological games, 'I see you're our new cabin-boy; pleased I am to see you'. This makes Jim feel self-important and he takes a liking to Silver. Silver is a master of Psychology, he has the Squire totally fooled and even Dr Livesey is taken in. The writer does this to take in the reader, convince the reader of Silver's honesty and adds to dramatic dimension of the revelation to Jim that he is a pirate. However in doing this the writer is opening up a totally different suspense for the more experienced reader, who has suspicions about Silver and picks up on the writer's signposts towards the truth. I think the lack of a father figure for Jim when he meets Silver is important. Jim wants to believe that he is someone he can trust. ...read more.

Conclusion

The reader sees this when Jim does not fall for Hands' ploy. In stead we see a wiser Jim, who is in control of the situation, and does not panic or act rashly. On the Hispaniola Jim and Israel explore the theme of afterlife and the cost of human life. Israel Hands talks of death and murder as matter of fact, still Jim is fearless in the face of this cold murderer. When Jim comes to kill Hands, it is almost the final rite of passage. Nobody can now accuse Jim of innocence. In the face of the pirates and being abandoned and betrayed by those he has done great service, he remains honourable and noble to his principles. The speech he delivers to the pirates is brave in the extreme. At the end of the story Jim has completed his 'rite of passage'. Throughout his experience he has refused to give in to greed and piracy, he stayed true to his course. Now he is a mature experienced young adult, whereas at the beginning of the novel he was a young boy being trodden on by the world. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Mark Twain section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Mark Twain essays

  1. Discuss and analyse the role and importance of the river in Twain’s The Adventures ...

    Huck's comments and fear, ' I see the fog closing down, and it made me so sick and scared I couldn't budge.'10 Thus portraying the river as not idyllic, proving that it is not always on the characters side. Twain's reason for doing this could be to stress the harsh

  2. Literary analysis of "Huckleberry Finn" and "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer"

    think you had grit enough to lay your hands on a man? Why, a man?s safe in the hands of ten thousands of your kind- as long as it?s daytime and you?re not behind him.? In this case, Twain suggests that true courage is to do the right thing, but most men will not stand up for the right thing.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work