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Was it right to shoot Candy’s dog?

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Introduction

Was It Right To Shoot Candy's Dog? It is in the second chapter that it is first brought up about Candy's dog being shot. It is Carson that initiates the argument. His first reason for killing Candy's dog was that it smelt saying "it stinks like hell" and "I can smell that dog a mile away." He then backed this up by saying "got no teeth, damn near blind, can't eat." Although Carlson says there are other things in favour of Candy's dog being killed you get the impression that his main reason was that the dog smelt and he wanted it out of the way. One of the ways this is given away is that there is repetition of Carlson complaining about the smell of the dog and the exaggeration of saying "I can smell him for two or three days." This was very selfish of him but did recognise that Candy would miss his dog so Carlson suggested to Slim that he "give him one of those pups to raise up" because Slims dog had just had some pups and he didn't want all of them. ...read more.

Middle

He tries to get them off the subject by telling them about their past times which is also used as an argument against killing his dog. He says, "I had him so long...since he was a pup." He is telling them how much he loves his dog and what they have been through together so they will have pity on the dog. This is when Carlson really starts to put pressure on Candy to let them kill his dog, coming up will many reasons why they should do it. Most of these arguments are to make Candy feel bad for keeping the dog alive. He says "this ol' dog jus suffers hisself," "he don't have no fun" and "you ain't bein' king to him keepin' him alive." He tries to guilt him into it. Candy tries to resist by saying, "no, I couldn't do that. I had him too long." It isn't very forceful because he said it softly because they are all against him and are wearing him down. ...read more.

Conclusion

They eventually wore him down because he needed someone to support him because he wasn't strong enough on his own. By convincing Candy to let them kill his dog, Carlson and the other men made Candy like them; having no companion so he is lonely, isolated. In my opinion, I think it was right for his dog to be killed but Candy should have done it himself. I think it was right for the dog because it was suffering due to its rheumatism. It was also nearly blind, it had no teeth so it couldn't eat so there was nothing left for him. Keeping it alive any longer would have been cruel and if Candy had kept it alive because he wanted a companion that would have been selfish because of what the dog would have to go through. They put it out of its misery before it got too bad and the dog would have resented Candy for keeping it alive. Jade McGreevy 11JB ...read more.

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