• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What impression of Dublin and its people does James Joyce give in his story 'Araby'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What impression of Dublin and its people does James Joyce give in his story 'Araby' 'Dubliners' is a book written by controversial Irish writer James Joyce, Dubliners was published in 1914 although the various stories in it were actually written between 1904 and 1907. James Joyce despised his homeland and every thing about it; he rejected Christianity, his family and Ireland, his country. In 1904, James left Ireland to live in Switzerland where he began to write Dubliners. James also rejected Irish literature and subsequently his favourite writers were Chekov, a Russian writer, Ibsen, a Norwegian writer and Zola, a French writer. James' hero was Charles Parnell, who was an Irish politician; James liked the idea of Home rule for the Irish but sadly, for him Parnell did not achieve Home rule. All of the streets mentioned in 'Araby' are real streets in Dublin. James Joyce begins 'Araby' by saying that North Richmond Street is 'blind', when you enter a cal de sac there's no escape, your trapped in, James Joyce implies that there's no vision on all of Dublin's streets and that there's no escape from them. The Christian Brother's School mention in 'Araby' is a school for poor children, 'set the boys free', James says that the children are imprisoned in the school; again Dublins people are trapped in. ...read more.

Middle

Every thing that James says about Dublin is pessimistic, 'the cold air stung us', Dublin is such a terrible city that even the air is violent, James always talks of the dark muddy lanes in Dublin, he think the roads in Dublin are not ft to be called roads. 'Rough tribes' is how James describes those living in the cottages, he suggests that Dublin's citizens are savage, primitive and barbaric, Joyce has a fear of those cottages. James uses repetition of the word 'dark' to really force through how gloomy and miserable Dublin is as a city. He regularly describes things as 'brown' and 'yellow' in 'Araby'; this implies that every thing in Dublin is equal to human waste. The boy who is featured in the story lives with his auntie and uncle, who he fears, there is no mention of his parents as all; family life is non-existent in Dublin. The boy adores Mangan's sister and he is always looking at her whenever he can, he stalks her. Adolescent infatuation is what the boy has on Mangan's sister, a crush. Mangan;s sister is always standing in the light, she is linked to brightness and she's the only ray of light in Dublin as everything else is in the dark apart for her. ...read more.

Conclusion

After Mrs Mercer had left, the boy felt uneasy, as his uncle had not yet come back, the boy was afraid that he might miss the bazaar and therefore not be able to buy Mangan's sister a present and to subsequently begin a new life with her. At last, the boy's uncle arrives home but he is drunk and has totally forgotten about the bazaar. 'I'm afraid you may put off your bazaar for this night of our Lord', James implies that the 'Lord' is stopping the boy from going to the bazaar; again religion is restricting Dublin's people from doing what they would like too. Finally, the boy is able to leave for the bazaar after reminding his drunk uncle to give him the money, he hops onto a 'deserted train' and leaves for the bazaar, the train is deserted, James says that life in Dublin is boring and dull. The train is deserted and it is a 'third-class carriage which is dirty and of poor quality like Dublin. When the boy makes it to 'Araby' the bazaar is over already however he enters and takes a look round a stall to see if he can find a suitable present for Mangan's sister. At the stall at which the boy looks there is a woman and two men, they are talking in a very flirtatious manner. ?? ?? ?? ?? Thomas Rutland Poetry 2005-06 'Araby' Coursework ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level James Joyce section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level James Joyce essays

  1. Joyce's attitude to Dublin in Dubliners

    in the divinity of Christ is not a salient feature of secular Christendom" (Ellmann 66). Eveline brings to mind a few significant points of self-realization. The theme in the story "Eveline" is the importance of childhood and young adulthood at Clongowes wood, "Emphasizing the keen sense impressions of the growing

  2. Compare and contrast Joyce's 'Araby' and 'Eveline'. Comment on the writer's effectiveness.

    and "Could she still draw back after everything he had ever done for her?" These are the questions that the writer asks for us in the third person perspective. We thus share her thought process successfully. The writer is effective in both 'Araby' and 'Eveline', yet my final point is on the similarities of both 'Araby' and 'Eveline's' themes.

  1. The story

    Eveline does want to get away, but simply does not know any other way of living. Eveline tries to trick herself into thinking that life isn't that bad. However, in reality she simply seems to greatly fear change because she does not know change. Dublin has become part of Eveline.

  2. The plight of the individual is most pertinently expressed through the plight of women ...

    However, that is not to say that the plight of the individual is not shown through men in 'Dubliners'. They are also affected by paralysis and ensnarement in societal values. One of the best examples of male paralysis is in 'A Little Cloud'.

  1. DUBLINERS - What picture do you think that Joyce gives of growing up in ...

    It is also symbolic of decay being covered up by ashes; the rotten core has been simply covered over. Although this was typical of many big cities at the time it would certainly have added to the negativity of Dublin life.

  2. Analyse the main themes and narrative devices introduced in The Sister

    treated by the priest and has been in a manipulative relationship with him. The first effect of this abusive relationship on the boy we see is the pride and arrogance instilled in his personality through the priest. He 'though his (priest's)

  1. What impression of Dublin and its people does James Joyce give in him story ...

    This also occurs in "The Dead" because a horse just goes around and around in circles, and also in "An Encounter" when a pervert tries to stop but end back in the same perverted world. At the end of the short stories James Joyce always write an epiphany, which is

  2. Joyce Intended Dubliners to betray the soul of that paralysis which many consider a ...

    This apprehension over change is supplemented with the embracing of pagan ideas into the Mundy home. Kate is very hesitant in the singing of pagan songs, and the explanations of pagan rituals, but as stated before, she too is starting to lose her faith.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work