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What is the dramatic significance of scene one of the play 'A Streetcar named Desire'?

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Introduction

What is the dramatic significance of scene 1 of the Play? 'A Streetcar named Desire' Scene 1 of this play has great dramatic significance. In this essay, I will be looking at key points throughout the scene that reveal the key features of the plot, characters, theme and imagery plus how it is used to give the audience a taster for what is to come. Scene one is set in New Orleans, I feel this is used because in peoples mind beforehand it has a strong emotional presence and is often associated with many types of genres such as music. Sight and smell are often used in plays to help people get a sense of atmosphere and this is no exception. Cleverly as always to make something stand out in the media eye Williams takes this one step further by combining the strong senses of glorious unbelieving sights of New Orleans and the vast cultural display of music to create a strong, atmospheric potion. It offers a romantic vision of dingy life(referring to the not so perfect world they live in). The mix of characters demonstrates the way that New Orleans has changed to other southern American cities. ...read more.

Middle

On top of the contrast between Stanley and Stella there is now an extra aspect of Blanche's true deception. This is first shown when Blanche, who is offered whiskey from Stanley, comments that she does not like to touch a glass, even though the audience have clearly seen her drink a glass alone while Stanley is not in the room. They realise her misleading self - I say this as because I know that Stanley has realised her deceit. She herself, does not know of his knowing and is still trying to mislead him from the truth by trying to get to him using her feminine charm. She thinks this will work, but luckily Stanley can see right through her. The impressions and feelings of Stanley are not too long introduced as his passionate and crude sides as soon shown and in the open to the audience as he was beginningly secretive about his emotions. Meaning this as in that he does not like to share his feelings with others if they are not what a real man's feelings should be. His denial of Blanche's beauty is significant because it shows that Blanche does not display Stanley's type of desire. ...read more.

Conclusion

She is often seen wearing white which I think symbolises her hopefulness and reassurance soft fabricated beauty of the delicate fabrics of somebody hiding behind a something she wants others to see that she is. Stanley is shown to be wearing always jeans and sometimes a change between his tight t-shirts to show his muscular upper body and his bright colourful bowling shirts maybe unmeaning to show his love for a man's sport. But the brightness and colour of the shirts could be used to stand out and be noticed in a bird like image. The sound effects are slightly used to add the striking effect of droning noise for such incidents as a cat screeching in a sudden change of mood to help the audience understand the current mood feelings. While lighting intervened into the adjustment of the themes and moods to help the audience understand the link-up of contrast and music. There are many themes of life throughout scene one that the audience are hooked upon - the main one being death and sexuality, such as when Blanche is stating the loss of "Belle Reve", so contrasting her hurt of having to deal with the death of her husband for her experience of the funeral. ...read more.

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