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Which heroine do you prefer and how do events throughout the books affect your opinion of them - Bridget Jones and Emma.

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Introduction

Gemma Illsley 10J Which heroine do you prefer and how do events throughout the books affect your opinion of them. The two heroines, Bridget Jones and Emma are obviously quite different in their attitudes to love and society as a whole. However, I think that in ways they are both likeable characters. The events that occur through the novels have an effect on the reader's opinions of the heroines and can weaken or strengthen these opinions. Austen and Fielding both use humour in the books well which is probably why the heroines are both seen as being comical at times or as is the case in 'Bridget Jones' Diary', more often than not. In Jane Austen's novel 'Emma', the heroine Emma is introduced to the reader at the very beginning of chapter 1. ...read more.

Middle

However, the reader is often told of Emma as being a compassionate character by the way she talks about Mr Weston, but this could also be viewed as quite patronising as well, "Mr Weston is such a good-humoured, pleasant, excellent man, that he thoroughly deserves a good wife" I then began to feel that Emma believed the matchmaking was for her friend's benefit and not herself. Although she did speak in patronising way about Mr Weston I do not think Emma realised how often she made it seem that she felt herself superior to her friends by patronising them. Emma could also be described as na�ve or foolish. She often involves herself too much in the lives of other and consequently tries to force relationships that were never meant to be, such as that between Mr Elton and Harriet Smith. ...read more.

Conclusion

It also seems very ironic that the only man Emma ever flirted with was engaged to another woman, he was the first man in the book that Emma had ever expressed her feelings of love or attraction to which was why it was ironic. I thought that Emma was subconsciously in love with Mr Knightley throughout the book and it became evident that this was true when I read her reaction to hearing that Harriet had strong feelings for Mr Knightley. She finally allowed herself to let the affection she had for him out and to realise them after so long. "She was most sorrowfully indignant, ashamed of every sensation but the one revealed to her - her affection for Mr Knightley". ...read more.

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