• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why Did A Stalemate Develop On The Western Front ?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Joseph Collins Why Did A Stalemate Develop On The Western Front ? A stalemate is when all sides are unable to advance further in the war. After the failure of the Schlieffen plan both armies were pushed into a stalemate, neither of the sides were able to make any progress or advance any further during the first World War. The Germans were pushed back from the river Marne to the river Aisne. When there both sides dug in. From this point the war was to be fought from trenches. The trenches dug by both sides eventually stretched seven hundred kilometers, from the Belgian coast to the Swiss border. Over the next four years of the war the Western Front hardly moved. Both sides were in stalemate. Stalemate occurred due to many reasons, not only did the German war plan fail (Schlieffen Plan) so did Plan 17 (The British war plan). Other reasons were : The terrible effects of modern weaponry, the race to the sea and the digging of trenches, the immense strength ...read more.

Middle

As they could no longer advance both sides dug trenches to prevent their enemy from advancing further. Trenches made it incredibly hard for either side to make any progress and advance as they were immensely strong, neither side was able to attack properly because trenches protected the enemy from attacks or artillery bombardments. Haig wasted valuable soldiers had an adverse impact on trench warfare because if the British side had more soldiers they would have been able to all attack at once and easily overpower the enemy and take their trenches. Furthermore the strengths of the trench system in comparison to the weakness of attacks also affected the stalemate immensely. As the trenches on both sides were well made it was very hard for the enemy to have any impact on them or even break through them. The weakness of the plans such as Plan 17 and the Schlieffen Plan had no impact on the enemy as they were rushed and poorly put together. ...read more.

Conclusion

the telephone meant that it was hard to receive information and if they had this information they would be able to plan a counter attack. Deaths due to heavy artillery fire caused the opposition to construct more trenches, more trenches meant no advancing on the enemy also helping create the stalemate. The main cause of the stalemate was the failure of the war plans and that neither side had a back-up plan. Should either side have prepared back-up plans it would have been easier to cope with attacks from the enemy however both sides were stubborn and stuck with what had given them previous success which lead to stalemate. The strength of the trenches in comparison to the weakness of attacks made it incredibly hard for the enemy to make any significant progress on the Western Front. This greatly helped the development of the stalemate as both sides were fighting a primarily defensive war and did little offensively, and their weaponry and the lack of information receiving technology all helped significantly create the stalemate. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. The impact of bombing during WWII

    his lack of concern for the war effort, and his uncooperative nature also indicates he has little respect for the home guard or national unity. Being in a rural village the home guard almost doesn't belong as they were in little danger, there fore it is easy to laugh at

  2. "Poems and stories; official accounts. Which of these give a more accurate picture of ...

    poetry is the last line in "Dulce et decorum est", where he says "My friend, you would not tell with such high zest to children ardent for some desperate glory, the old lie: Dulce et

  1. The First World War - The Stalemate on the Western Front - Source based ...

    was very early on in the war and both sides were not settled down. C also is not of that much use as it only shows a small part of the battlefield, it may have been the same all the way up the line but we can not tell just from this one photo.

  2. Why was Trench Warfare so terrible

    and men tried to secure their food during the night to stop rats eating it. What were the attitudes of soldiers to the war? Did they see it as terrible? Ernst J´┐Żnger's The Storm of Steel is a unique and interesting book.

  1. Was the German Defeat on the Western Front Caused by the Failure of the ...

    attack and caused the Germans great losses and knocked their confidence, but they recovered and carried on. They thought things were going more easily than planned so they decided to shorten the route and cut inside Paris. This proved to be a fatal error, the move was spotted by a

  2. Why Did the Stalemate on the Western Front Occur?

    There were breakthroughs, but reinforcements were too slow to exploit these occasions. After about 4 months, Haig called off the offensive. In total, the British had received about 420,000 casualties, the French received nearly 200,000, and the Germans were estimated to have taken around 500,000 casualties.

  1. The Trenches on the Western Front.

    Pullman slept here one morning and woke up to find one sitting on his face. I can't face that, so I share Newbery's dugout." So I am sure there was rats in the trenches. All in no mans land was barbed wire this was to stop infantry to getting into your trench.

  2. New technologies and their effect on the stalemate on the Western Front.

    As a result of this German aces such as Max Immelmann and Oswald Boelcke became national heroes as their number of victories increased. This period of German domination of the skies was known as the 'Fokker Scrouge'. However in 1916 this advantage was lost when Allied pilots received aircraft (like

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work