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With close reference to the language and imagery of the passage, show in what ways it helps to establish the relationship between Miranda and Prospero (Act 1 Scene 2 Lines 1-134)

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Introduction

The Tempest With close reference to the language and imagery of the passage, show in what ways it helps to establish the relationship between Miranda and Prospero (Act 1 Scene 2 Lines 1-134) Act one scene two opens with Miranda and Prospero standing on an island, after having just witnessed a shipwreck. Right from the first line we can establish the relationship between Miranda and Prospero, "My dearest father" (line 1.) As the scene commences, we begin to learn a great deal about the two roles. Miranda opens the scene as she questions her father about the huge storm. "you have put the wild waters in this roar" (line 2.) Miranda presumes that her father was capable of the "tempest" and therefore this portrays that she does not have much trust for him. Miranda's kindness and innocence is portray heart" (line 8/9) and this contrasts to her father who is not as concerned as she is "Tell your piteous heart there's no harm done" (line 14.) ...read more.

Middle

(line 50.) Prospero goes into great depth in describing Prospero's brother and how he overthrew him. This is because Prospero wants to make sure that Miranda understands everything that he went through, and why he wants his revenge on his brother. Prospero also asks many times if Miranda is listening. "Dost thou attend me?" (line 78) and "Dost thou hear?" (line 106.) This is once again to make sure that Miranda fully understands everything that is going on and to check that she is taking it all in. This use of repetition once again portrays Prospero's control over Miranda and that he is almost obsessive with the past events. Miranda's language is very melodramatic and shocking as she hears about her past and the hell that her father went through. "Oh the heavens" (line 116) Miranda feels that she was a burden to her father and feels awful. "Alack, what trouble I was then to you" (line 152.) ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare uses very effective language and imagery to portray to the audience the close relationship between Miranda and Prospero. In particular it is clear that Prospero has a lot of control over his daughter and that she respects him very much. This is shown by his authoritative language and the stage directions, helping to show the character's status on stage. In the beginning of the scene Prospero may be conveyed as a malicious villain, who caused the tempest, but as the scene commences, we begin to see a softer side to Prospero as he talks to Miranda. This shows that Miranda brings out the pleasant side of Prospero, and it is clear that he cares about his daughter very much. Shakespeare uses appropriate vocabulary to describe the history of the past events, and the other characters involved, for example the "perfidious" brother Antonio. This therefore helps the audience to understand what a good father Prospero is to Miranda when he went through such tough conditions. How language and imagery helps to establish the relationship between Miranda and Prospero (Act 1 Scene 2 Lines 1-134) 1 ...read more.

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