• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

With close reference used to dramatic methods, discuss Shakespeares portrayal of Hotspur in Act 3 Scene 1.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐With close reference used to dramatic methods, discuss Shakespeare?s portrayal of Hotspur in Act 3 Scene 1. Hotspur has several ongoing characteristics in the play, with the main one that is constantly being brought forward is his egotism that shows in his interaction with other characters. In line 16, after listening to Glendower?s boast, Hotspur feels that his ego has been threatened. This character development tells us that Hotspur doesn?t like to be outshone by others. ?Why, so can I, or so can any man, but will they come when you do call for them?? Hotspur?s taunting tone is shown here as he claims anyone can do what Glendower says he can do, but questions if it will actually work, belittling him. ?Methinks my moiety, north from Burton here, in quantity equals not one of yours.? Hotspur believes he deserves more, and he would re-route the channel to get his way; ?And here the smug and silver Trent shall run in a new channel, fair and evenly. ...read more.

Middle

?Let me not understand you, then; speak it in Welsh.? This recurring characteristic adds character development to Hotspur. When it comes to plot development, Hotspur forgetting the map at the start of the scene shows that he is impractical and has a lack of foresight. Also, his lack of sophistication and refinement is shown when he insults literature, meaning Shakespeare portrays Hotspur as very uncultured. His fiery and argumentative side is exhibited with his use of imagery in the scene, however his political naivety in also revealed as he allows personal feelings to intrude on his personal relationships, and presents his lack of diplomatic maturity. Hotspur?s arrogance is exposed when he begins arguing for the sake of arguing after interaction with Glendower in a battle of wills makes Hotspur boast after Glendower gives in, and once again feeds into his egotistical side. Another thing established in this scene is Hotspur?s reputation, as after more interaction with Glendower, he reveals what others say about him and that he has a renowned, infamous and fearsome reputation. ...read more.

Conclusion

Heart, you swear like a comfit-maker?s wife!? He tries one last time to convince her ?Come, sing.? But she still won?t, to which he leaves in anger; ?I?ll away within these two hours, and so come in when ye will.? and leaves her in tears. Hotspur disregards other?s feelings and wishes, even his Lady?s. This brings up Hotspur?s cruel ways and his childlike actions when he does not get his way, along with his selfishness, and his irresponsibility towards his personal relationships. In this scene, Shakespeare continues to portray Hotspur with a mocking attitude, a hot tempered mind, his open mind and the fact that he is a ruthless fighter, and starts to bring up his self centered, impatient and immature acts, that is mainly brought to our attention through his interaction with other characters and his actions during heated and normal moments, from battle, to conversations in the Boar?s Head Tavern. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Other works section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Other works essays

  1. The contrast between Hotspur and Hal is the main theme in Henry IV part ...

    The King then goes on to talk about how little respect people have for Hal and how he has lost his place on the council "thy place in council thou hast rudely lost". Hal is obviously hurt by the extent to which he has lost his father's affection and respect

  2. A comparison (up to the end of Act 3) of the 'courts' of Henry ...

    He would make a joke out of everything, but never a true word be spoken from his mouth. The only person Falstaff would look after is himself, when it came to anyone else he was never interested. After all these characteristics, he has many friends.

  1. Consider How Shakespeare Presents and Develops the Character of Prince Hal and Hotspur In ...

    "Hang him, let him tell the king! We are prepared" Says Hotspur rashly when it is clear that he has foolishly revealed his plot to someone who is not loyal to him. We see Prince Hal is worried in Act 2 Scene 4 that the robbery is not the sort of thing a future King should be involved in.

  2. To what extent does the tragedy of Titus Andronicus unfold from the protagonist and ...

    He feels he must now obey the emperor, but his subservient actions lead to his killing of his own son and the betrayal of his daughter, and so the little paternal sentiment we previously saw is destroyed.

  1. Richard III, explore the way Shakespeare shapes an audience's response to Richard

    Nay, now dispatch; 'twas I that stabb'd young Edward; But 'twas thy heavenly face that set me on.' Shakespeare's language here summons mixed emotions for the audience. Firstly, we should consider that Richard is indeed pushing his power to its limits as he encompasses subtle hints that he is lying

  2. Taking into consideration of the language and structure of the play, how would you ...

    Therefore I would direct the actor to change his whole physicality from when he is on stage with others and when on his own. When talking to himself, his posture will be strong (for a disabled man) and his chin pulled close to him; to show his self-confidence in his intelligence, yet his secrecy.

  1. who in your opinion is the true hero of Henry the fourth part 1

    Because he is a criminal, his promises seem invalid, however the audience feels an element of trust because Shakespeare portrays Hal as the exciting loveable rogue. Shakespeare uses the soliloquy as an opportunity to allow the audience an insight into Hal's redemption plan.

  2. Write a dramatic monologue in the style of Aaron reflecting on the motivation for ...

    Enter Tamora alone with Aaron (466 words) The commentary: Within the first few sentences of the monologue I have used an extended metaphor. ?Constantly conquering the smell of seduction that passes via the left nostril,? this is showing what Aaron is mainly focusing on throughout this monologue.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work