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With specific reference to the two soliloquies, which we have studied in detail, show how Shakespeare reveals to the audience Hamlets character, state of mind and his problems.

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Introduction

Mitchell Routledge With specific reference to the two soliloquies, which we have studied in detail, show how Shakespeare reveals to the audience Hamlet's character, state of mind and his problems. A soliloquy is when an actor is talking by himself on the scene while revealing his thoughts to the audience. This gives you a good idea about what is going on in the characters head, in this case Hamlet's. We have annotated and studied two scenes of the play "Hamlet" in particular, Act 1 Scene 2 and Act 3 scene 1. The fist soliloquy appears right after Claudius and his mother, Gertrude got married. His father had not died long before, and Hamlet could not believe his mother was married and sleeping with his uncle less than two months after his father's death. He seems very confused and frustrated in this soliloquy. ...read more.

Middle

He repeated himself because he could not believe Gertrude had married his uncle. "Married with my uncle, my father's brother." He cannot believe that it really is his father's brother who is married to his mother because it is incest. He also doubts his mother's grief for his father's death. "Ere yet the salt of unrighteous tears had left the flushing in her galled eyes." Here he says that she was not really sad and had insincere tears. This is how he sees it, his mother and Claudius see it very normal to marry so soon and he finds it weird especially because Claudius is his uncle. In the second soliloquy he is in a corridor and it is very private. The structure is more organized this means he is less confused. He talks about suicide and death. ...read more.

Conclusion

Claudius and Gertrude do not know he is upset and this surprises Hamlet. He is also very confused about his mother marrying his uncle, and his father dying. He stops in the middle of his sentences. In these soliloquies he uses words like Hyperion, which shows he is very educated. In the first soliloquy he uses lots of stops, which give the effect to show his confusion and stress in his life. And then he repeats a lot of things; also an effect of stress and confusion, and how he does not believe it is true that his mother and his uncle are married. The imagery is mostly shown through the metaphors. Shakespeare has shown us Hamlet's character and his thoughts through these soliloquies and used a lot of different types of language; he used repetition to show he was confused and frustrated. He used metaphors to show how he really felt, etc. These two soliloquies help us understand Hamlet's feelings and his problems. The imagery shows his state of mind and his character. ...read more.

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