• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

With the use of textual illustration, describe Macbeth's varying characteristics; discuss the dramatic effect of his encounters with the supernatural elements; and suggest how your opinion of Macbeth may be altered during the course of the play.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

25/11/2001 English Coursework Essay With the use of textual illustration, describe Macbeth's varying characteristics; discuss the dramatic effect of his encounters with the supernatural elements; and suggest how your opinion of Macbeth may be altered during the course of the play. By Felix Crosse The play I am writing this essay in description of, is a well-known work of the playwright 'William Shakespeare'. 'Macbeth' is a story of a short period of a Scottish Nobles life, in relation to his actions concerning others. At the start of the play, Macbeth is described as being a kind, yet powerful man, who has battled against Scotland's foes. However as the story continues, it is evident that he is corrupted and destroyed, and by the first few scenes, he has taken the life of his king. The story itself tells us only of his deeds concerning others. It goes into no great detail over other events of the play, and was obviously written originally, to be a play. However brief the account of the play is, this is one of the greatest literary works of Shakespeare, and the fact that Shakespeare is one of the most commonly known authors means that his works cannot be dismissed lightly. ...read more.

Middle

In my opinion, this area of the book is not one that concentrates on Macbeth's confidence, but Macbeth's arrogance, and how his is so sure of himself, he is not even scared of death. Supernatural themes are commonly found throughout the book, and the dramatic effects of using them are among the strongest in the entire book. Using ghosts, and apparitions in the play gives it a somewhat eerie feeling, and the goes on to affect how the characters interact. Each time Macbeth meets with either the witches, or some other supernatural element, he seems to change. It is obvious, from the start, that he is terrified both, by the prospect of murder, and the witches themselves. Taking the second scene involving the witches [act 1, scene 3], it is obvious from this scene alone that the supernatural, used in such a method, creates some kind of void near afterwards. Shakespeare tends to fills that void usually, with confusion, or even conversation between the other parties involved (eg, Macbeth, Banquo), but even as he does, there is still some need for something more. This scene involves the three witches, Macbeth, and Banquo. This is the scene where Macbeth's premonition, via the witches, comes to light, and it is shown that Macbeth will be, "...Thane of Glamis...Thane of Cawdor...and King hereafter..." ...read more.

Conclusion

The witches, in this scene produce predictions about Macbeth, and Banquo, and it is from this original prediction that Macbeth has cause to change. The witches tell him he will be thane of Glamis, Cawdor, and King later. He is already thane of Glamis, and just after he has been told this information, Ross arrives with news of Macbeth being given 'thaneship' of Cawdor, as of the death of another thane. From this point, Macbeth does change. As a direct result of the witches predictions, and the fact that, later in the play he tells his wife of the predictions, Macbeth changes. He becomes more restless, possibly consequential of the murders he (sometimes through assassins) commits. He also becomes more ruthless, not caring about lives he destroys, or even countries. He is ruthless in his quest for power, and that become obvious soon after he kills Banquo (via. assassins). Another thing he becomes, towards the end of the play, is uncontrolled, and (to use a phrase that is not ideal) perhaps mad, with grief at what he has done, and what he is going to do next. This revelation is not surprising, considering what he is done, and how he has almost completely ignored his conscience. In conclusion, the play Macbeth is a complex, but decipherable production. Throughout the play, Macbeth does change, sometimes by great 'leaps', and I believe that I have shown that. English Coursework: Shakespeare's 'Macbeth' By Felix Crosse 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Macbeth section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Macbeth essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    It is not only the heros character that feeds into the construction of a ...

    4 star(s)

    The fact that Macbeth would allow his wife to take control of him in such a manner demonstrates the unnatural nature of all that Macbeth is, from the setting in which the events of the play takes place (a cold, almost inhospitable landscape would be unfamiliar to a Jacobean audience),

  2. What prevents Macbeth from being nothing more than the story of a ruthless and ...

    Especially that he should be aware of Macduff strikes out to him and once more he acts on the witches' prophecies and sends murderers to kill Macduff's family. This is probably the most coldblooded act he commits throughout the play.

  1. By considering the soliloquies, analyse how Macbeth's character changes as the play progresses.

    In summary, this soliloquy is the primary insight into the mind of the main character and what Shakespeare portrays is a greedy man with the foundations of a murderous scheme. However he is a little unsure and perhaps afraid. The next speech to be assessed is somewhat shorter and can be found in Act 1, Scene 4, Lines 47-58.

  2. Macbeth Essay

    Macbeth has turned from noble to a traitor and completely evil. Macbeth is about to become even more evil in our eyes because he then orders the murder of his main rival Macduffs innocent family, 'The castle of Macduff I will surprise; ......give to th'edge o' th' sword His wife, his babes, and all unfortunate souls' (Act 4 scene 1)

  1. How does Shakespeare present the witches in an interesting and dramatic way?

    Much like when speakers at political rallies. Speaking slowly and with a certain rhythm, the good politicians manage to keep the audience going and interested. It is done as if to awaken the people for the arrival of the main character.

  2. Macbeth - Act 4 Scene 1: Discuss the Dramatic Potential in this scene.

    This reinforces the fact that he is no longer the loyal and brave person he was before. The audience would find this frightening, because they know that Macbeth has changed forever. The audience will start to feel that Macbeth is not scared of evil, because he has been transformed from a good person to an evil one by the witches.

  1. Macbeth - Do the witches heighten the dramatic impact of the play?

    an evil character in the play so giving them a hideous look gives them the extra character realism and also with the witches' appearance this ugly, the watching audience will see how devilish the witches are. The way the other characters talk about the witches shows how ugly the witches

  2. Analyse 3 scenes from ‘Macbeth’ and discuss how they contribute to the play as ...

    Macbeth responds to the prophecies with many questions. Macbeth doesn't know anything about him being Thane of Cawdor. "I know I am Thane of Glamis; but how of Cawdor? The king of Cawdor lives". Later on in the scene it is revealed to him that he is also Thane of Cawdor.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work