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Wuthering Heights. Catherine and Hindleys mistreatment of Heathcliff during their childhood leading him to revenge in the future demonstrates character development. Heathcliffs desire to fulfill his wicked needs of revenge due to unfortuna

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Introduction

ISU: Wuthering Heights The past influences the future. This is a fact in the novel Wuthering Heights, by the author Emily Bronte. As quoted by a reviewer, this novel is: "An intriguing tale of revenge in which the main characters are controlled by consuming passions." It is clearly consistent throughout the novel that mistreatment during the childhood of an individual, leading them to seek revenge, reveals character development. Catherine and Hindley's mistreatment of Heathcliff during their childhood leading him to revenge in the future demonstrates character development. Heathcliff's desire to fulfill his wicked needs of revenge due to unfortunate events encountered at a young age also reveals a change of character. Lastly, Heathcliff's corruption towards his wife and son due to mistreatment encountered during his childhood leading him to revenge, illustrates an evolution of character. With the aid of these points, the author is successful in proving her theme. Catherine and Hindley's mistreatment of Heathcliff during their childhood, leading him to seek revenge, reveals a change of character. This is first portrayed during the Earnshaws' first dinner with the Lintons, where Hindley disapproves of Heathcliff's presence at the dinner table and sends him away: "'He shall have his share of my hand if I catch him downstairs again till dark,' cried Hindley. 'Begone you vagabond! What, you are attempting the coxcomb, are you? ...read more.

Middle

Following the humiliation Heathcliff is forced to encounter due to Hindley's cruel actions, his only solution is to take revenge on Hindley for his abuse: "'I only wish I knew the best way! Let me alone, and I'll plan it out: while I'm thinking of that, I don't feel pain'" (Bronte 69). Heathcliff reaches a point where he can no longer handle the abuse of others. He instead, reveals to Nelly and the reader the bitter feelings that resign inside of him. He is ready for revenge. This event illustrates the character change Heathcliff encounters. Previously being the boy dismissing bullying from others, he turns into the most desperate person for revenge. Slowly isolating himself from the rest of the people, Heathcliff eventually takes the extreme path, and leaves Wuthering Heights. Shortly following his return form his long disappearance, Heathcliff has returned as a well educated and civilized man. Nelly further describes his appearance: "He had grown a tall, athletic, well-formed man...His countenance was much older in expression,...it looked intelligent,...A half-civilized ferocity lurked yet in the depressed brows, and eyes full of black fire, but it was subdued" (Bronte 109). Upon his return to Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff's appearance is completely changed, but the struggle is figuring out whether his heart is also changed for the better. ...read more.

Conclusion

Forcing his son Linton into marrying Cathy, Catherine's daughter, Heathcliff knows that her home, the Grange, will fall into Linton's hands. Linton's death being near due to his illness, predicts the Grange would then be in Heathcliff's possession, making him successful in attaining the fortunes of both his enemies, Hindley and Edgar. In doing so, he corrupts the life of his own son, proving himself to being a heartless and selfish man. Heathcliff in the end takes advantage of his power in order to lead the innocent in to suffering, proving that he had been impacted as a child, having the urge to release his anger on his enemies' loved ones. In conclusion, mistreatment during the childhood of an individual, leading them to seek revenge, reveals character development, as shown in the novel, Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte. Through Catherine and Hindley's mistreatment of Heathcliff leading him to revenge in the future demonstrates character development; Heathcliff's desire to fulfill his wicked needs of revenge due to unfortunate events encountered at a young age, also reveals a change of character; lastly, Heathcliff's corruption towards his wife and son due to mistreatment encountered during his childhood leading him to revenge, illustrates an evolution of character. Therefore, one would conclude that this novel is indeed "...a compound of vulgar depravity and unnatural horrors..." (Unknown Author), proving that the actions of one individual can shape the actions of another. ...read more.

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