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Wuthering Heights Setting

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Introduction

Wuthering Heights: Setting Whether it's the dark, lugubrious Wuthering Heights, or the luxurious, respectable Thrushcross Grange, the settings in Wuthering Heights are very interesting and represent so much more than just places. The Novel revolves around two central places, Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange. Although other places are mentioned such as Gimmerton, these are the only two places that the novel really takes place in. Due to the lack of space and settings, the novel becomes very claustrophobic and the narrative festers within these two settings. The only place for characters to have freedom is the Moores, the setting that is natural, rugged and not man made. In Wuthering Heights, Emily Bronte is able to use the setting of the English moors to show two different aspects of the world and symbolically, the destructive nature of love. At one end there is Wuthering Heights and the evil that results in the cruelty that its inhabitants force upon each other, while the other end is Thrushcross Grange and the naivety and ignorance that results from its "utopia-like" atmosphere. For Heathcliff and Catherine, who will destroy anyone for the other, the only peace that can be reached is in the middle of the two estates where they can live by their own rules. The irony of the story is that Catherine and Heathcliff's obsessive love not only leads to their destruction, but to the destruction of the others who loved them. ...read more.

Middle

In the poem We Sat at the Window, Hardy talks about how he and Emma shared a hotel room in Bournemouth on Swithins day. It seems rather trivial that the poem is set on Swithins day, yet as folklore goes, if it rains upon Swithins day, it will rain for forty days straight. And we see in the poem that the couple are distant and unattached, this could be the beginning of the end, as Swithins day is the beginning of the end for the summer. In the poem it would seem as if, even though the two people are in close proximity to each other, they are mentally a hundred miles away from each other, love has been eroded, and the foundation of feelings has corroded. The language used is very effecting in adding to the dismal feeling of the poem. In the line, "Babbled unchecked in the busy way" The use of onomatopoeia emphasises the lack of dialogue between the pair, that even water can be heard more than them. Despite this, the use of the pronoun "We" in lines such as the title "We Sat at the Window" shows that the poet still has feelings about his partner. Another of Hardy's poems where a setting is quite pivotal in influencing a relationship is Neutral Tones. The lure of "Neutral Tones" by Thomas Hardy is in its subtle familiarity. ...read more.

Conclusion

Revenge is emphasized by locks and keys as well because Heathcliff seeks revenge on Catherine and he keeps control over her by locking her in Wuthering Heights. When he decides that he does not want to continue his revenge plan, he unlocks his true feelings to Nelly and admits he feels weaker and older than when he decided to exact his revenge. Bronte uses locks and keys to stress important the themes of isolation, secrecy, and revenge. In the poem The Self Unseeing, Hardy writes about a man, most likely himself, returning to his old family home. The tone is very nostalgic, in that he realises that the time spent on the "ancient floor" was the best of his life. Hardy uses a domestic scene so the reader can identify with the emotions he is going though and progressively the reader becomes more emotionally connected with the poet. Hardy, in this poem, is a time torn man, not to dissimilar to what stereotype Heathcliff fulfils within Wuthering Heights. A man who wants to regain what he once had, whether it be love from a female companion or ones family. The poet also uses fire to represent feelings and situations, such as in the line "Smiling into the fire" Although Hardy uses fire to represent happiness; it is very similar to the fire metaphors in Wuthering heights, used to represent passion and aggression. We know that the poem is written in retrospect due to the use of past tense, "I Danced", "She sat here". Kyle Smith ...read more.

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