• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

account for the development of the global eonomy and the associated network of cities

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Account for the development of the global economy and the associated world network of cities. As the global economy changes over time, so has world network of cities shifted to accommodate these changes. Developments in the global economy is inextricably linked with the growth of urban places. The most recent economic development is the emergence of a new economy, globalisation. Globalisation and the growing influential power of transnational corporations (TNCs) have created a global hierarchy of cities with those in the developed world on top and the developing world beneath. Globalisation has also caused economic disparity between cities, which have resulted in the emergence of two types of cities-dominant and dependent. Finally globalisation has caused changes to role of regional centres, often leading to the demise of small towns. Throughout history, developments in the global economy have shaped the world network of cities. The first city emerged over 5000 years ago with urbanisations in Mesopotamia. The Industrial Revolution in the sixteenth century brought a revival of the significance of European cities. It allowed many of these cities to develop their economy before many in the southern hemisphere. In the colonial era, many cities of the 'southern' unindustrialised cities became colonies to the industrialised 'north'. ...read more.

Middle

Dominant world cities link all cities together as they are the control centres and command points of the global economy through finance and business. Hence any decisions made can have a flow on effect across the world due to the close links between the world network of cities. The cause of dominant world city's importance derives from the fact that many TNC and large national corporation head quarters are located in and/or originated from these cities. TNCs have enormous influence on the global economy because they often dominate government decision-makings. This is due to the fact that TNCs not only decide what they will produce, but the location of production. This decision influences the economy of the city through the amount of employment, infrastructure and technology that accompanies the set up the production workshop. TNCs have caused a spatial shift in cities, as manufacturing plants are relocated to places where production cost are low or being decentralised into component parts to specialised areas. For instance the white goods company Electrolux, whose head quarter is in Sweden, made decisions in 2004 to cut its workforce by 20% as the company decided to move some of its operations to low cost Asian locations. ...read more.

Conclusion

The lack of world cities in Africa reflects the continent's marginalisation within the world economy. The spatial distribution of world cities also reflects the north-south divide. Globalisation has also caused changes to the role of regional centres and rural towns. TNC's strategic choice of locations to extend and maximise their influence within the global economy have lead to the growth of metropolitan and regional centres. Regional centres are attracting increasingly concentrated amount of control because they offer a concentration of industry and the availability of more options in areas such as lifestyle, employment and services. As these places become more important, there is a general decline in small towns. This means that it is harder for small towns, with limited functions and a small population, to survive. Developments in the global economy have shaped the world network of cities. The most recent economic development is the emergence of a new economy, globalisation. The growth of TNCs as a result of rapid globalisation has created a global hierarchy of cities as well as economic disparities between the cities of the developed and developing world. This in turn, has caused the emergence of dominant and dependent cities. Finally, globalisation has caused changes to the role of regional towns, often leading to the demise of small towns. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition essays

  1. Assess the extent to which Trans National Corporations (TNCs) have a positive impact ...

    Another factor affecting the social side of TNC's in developed countries is that Transnational Corporations have altered their working patterns towards more shift workers, and more short contracts, as a result of this employees no longer form long-term relationships with one another, or with their company.

  2. International Ecotourism Management: Using Australia and Africa as Case Studies.

    This can involve the assurance of positive economic impact to local communities, the closure of culturally sensitive sites to tourism, and involvement in management. The issue of co-management, between indigenous people and government agencies, is hotly debated in many countries.

  1. Free essay

    Transnational corporations. There are two types of TNCs that affect health globally in very ...

    drug that could essentially give them longer to live or even save their life. This includes many of the new drugs that the WHO regard as essential drugs are not available in generic form which affects global health because LEDCs cannot afford the drugs they need.

  2. Discuss the view that poor road network is a greatest hindrance to economic development ...

    30% of the roads are tarred but have outlived their life span, therefore they are in bad condition.60% of the roads are gravel and earth and become inaccessible during wet season. Among the roads not tarred as at 2002 were; Kaning'ina, Zolozolo, Masasa and Viphya.4 The M26, Chitipa-Karonga road network

  1. Development of the leisure and recreation industry

    57 Going to the cinema 13 15 16 Go to a live art show 7 7 7 Visits to other Entertainment 21 22 22 Museums and Galleries 12 15 15 Visits to Historic Buildings 14 15 15 Visiting places of interest 24 26 27 Watching football 5 5 5 All

  2. The Meaning of Globalisation and its Effects

    Economic freedom. In democracy, people must have economic freedom. This means that the government allows people to own private property and business can choose work and join trade unions. There should be free markets in which this state should not control the economy.

  1. Newly industrialised countries have been, and continue to be, the driving force of globalisation. ...

    or Special Economic Zones (SEZs) were formed wherein preferable tax rates were given in return for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), then the economy of China grew. For example, it?s capita grew by more than 8% in 1990, increasing by about 10% per year afterward.

  2. Account for the uneven nature of world development

    GDP grew by 4% in Nicaragua in 1998 which was less than estimated. Similarly in Honduras, GDP was estimated to grow 5% in 1998 but it only grew 3% due to the hurricane. GDP (gross domestic product) is also an indicator of development, it shows the total value of goods

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work