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"An investigation into the methods of coastal management along Brighton's Coastline and the reasons for them".

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Md. Shahajada Chowdhury 11H 5613 Geography Coursework Mr A. Ali 10548 "An investigation into the methods of coastal management along Brighton's Coastline and the reasons for them". Contents Introduction_________________________________________________________________________4-10 Aims__________________________________________________________________________5 Coastal Management_____________________________________________________________6 Hypothesis_____________________________________________________________________6 Longshore Drift_________________________________________________________________6 Costal Damages_______________________________________________________________6-7 Coastal Protection_____________________________________________________________7-9 Hard Engineering________________________________________________7-9 Soft Engineering__________________________________________________9 Facts on Brighton_____________________________________________________________9-10 Methodology_______________________________________________________________________12-89 Data Collection______________________________________________________________15-25 Beach Profiles________________________________________________16-18 Pebble Analysis_______________________________________________19-20 Groyne Measurements__________________________________________21-22 Tourism Questionnaires____________________________________________23 Car disc survey__________________________________________________24 Traffic survey___________________________________________________25 Data Presentation___________________________________________________________28-54 Groyne Measurements_______________________________________________28-38 Pebble Analysis Recording Sheet_______________________________________39-47 Beach Profile______________________________________________________48-54 Description of Results________________________________________________________56-61 Groyne Measurements__________________________________________56-59 Beach Profile___________________________________________________60 Pebble Analysis__________________________________________________61 Analysis of Results___________________________________________________________63-68 Groyne Measurements__________________________________________63-64 Beach Profile___________________________________________________65 Pebble Analysis__________________________________________________66 Surveys; Questionnaires_________________________________________67-74 Methodology__________________________________________70-74 Questionnaire_____________________________________71 Road Tax Survey__________________________________72 Traffic Survey____________________________________72 Maps____________________________________________72 Results_______________________________________73-89 Car Survey________________________________75 Questionnaire___________________________76-89 Conclusion_________________________________________________________________________91-95 Hypothesis 1___________________________________________________________________92 Hypothesis 2___________________________________________________________________93 Hypothesis 3________________________________________________________________94-95 Evaluation____________________________________________________________________________97 Limitations____________________________________________________________________________99-102 Groyne Measurements_______________________________________________________________99 Pebble Analysis____________________________________________________________________100 Beach Profile_____________________________________________________________________101 Questionnaires; Car Disc Survey______________________________________________________102 Appendix_____________________________________________________________________________104-106 Reasons for the type of graph, chart etc____________________________________________105-106 Bibliography______________________________________________________________________________108 Introduction:- For our Year 10 geography coursework we went to Brighton. The purpose of this visit is to study coastal protection along Brighton's coastline. The visit is a one-day outing to Brighton, a coastal region situated on the South Coast, this is shown in Figure 1. Figure 1: Location of Brighton in England Figure 2: Location of Brighton in Europe Brighton, a small coastline town, depends on the incoming of 'tourism' to boost its reputation. These include many attraction sites such as the beach standing out the most dominantly. Aims:- 1. Variations of coastline managements along the coastline itself (differences of the managements used and in the specific regions) 2. The extent of the effects of these managements (how useful they were and to what degree they were used) 3. The significance of tourism on Brighton's economy (the level of reliance Brighton has for its tourist system) Several investigations were taken place to establish the aims, listed above. Coastal Management Hypothesis:- Brighton has its ups and downs, even though it may be booming in popularity it suffers from serious coastal changes. ...read more.

Middle

This could be because of the fact that waves were constantly bashing the beach and the stones were constantly being moved. Therefore the rounded and the angular stones could be anywhere on the beach, there was no pattern. The results on the other hand tell me that the larger stones were further up the beach and the smaller ones were closest to the shoreline. For example at 0 metres the sizes of the stones were 25; 24; 28; 21; 18; 10; 15; 13; 14 and 25 millimetres. This was to be considered relatively small. In comparison at 35 metres the stones were much larger as they were 45; 35; 75; 40; 51; 49; 35; 40; 50 and 32 millimetres. The reason why, was the fact that material was sorted along the beach profile by the wave energy. For instance, large stones will be at the top of the beach profile as they were larger and when they were dumped at the top by the swash, the backwash won't have the sufficient amount of energy to bring them down. The swash will be able to put them at the top because the top of the wave will not be affected by the friction which occurs between the sea bed and the waves. Large pebbles will be in the middle as; once the swash dumps them at the top the backwash will be able to bring them down but not too much or as a result they will be in the middle. Finally, the small pebbles will be dragged down completely by the backwash as they were smaller and lighter as a result they will be nearer to the shoreline. Surveys; Questionnaires and Photos etc:- This hypothesis is about tourism and if it is important to Brighton's economy. In order to test this hypothesis we were asked to do some experiments. These included such things as surveys, questionnaires and taking photos etc. ...read more.

Conclusion

This portrays a line of best fit to state how the distribution is split, and by this you can see the trend that lies. 29 A chart showing how the pebble analysis ends up when they are all averaged out. By doing a hand-drawn graph I can determine how the pebble analysis varies along the shoreline in the different sites. 30-34 Graph showing the Beach profile results on all four sites I have chosen this specific graph because it will show me how as the distance increases what happens to the angle. 35 A hand-drawn overlay graph showing the beach profile on all four sites I chose this because once it has been done you can compare it as they are all beneath each other, and can then state the similarities and differences. 37 Map showing how Brighton can be accessed. This shows to me how an individual can travel to Brighton i.e. walking. 38 Location of where the questionnaire was done. This shows to me where we performed the questionnaire as it was one of the Hypotheses. 39 Showing where the origin of cars comes from. This shows to me how most of the cars come from, and this diagram gives a clear explanation of this. 41 Pie chart showing how the car survey was divided into sectors A pie chart is excellent for making comparisons and producing quality evidence of how it is divided into sectors. 42-45 Pie chart showing how the questions that were asked to an individual in the produced questionnaire A pie chart is excellent for making comparisons and producing quality evidence of how it is divided into sectors. 46 A pictogram showing how an individual has arrived into Brighton This is very sophisticated and this will supplement how the questionnaire is functioning because this also shows the picture along with the results. 47-55 Pie chart showing how the questions that were asked to an individual in the produced questionnaire A pie chart is excellent for making comparisons and producing quality evidence of how it is divided into sectors. ...read more.

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