• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12

Bourn Brook - We do field work because we need to learn the skills to do the practical experience.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Bourn Brook - Introduction We do field work be cause we need to learn the skills to do the practical experience. We visited the river because we need to do the research of the river. We need to know how deep, width, velocity, erosion, bed load and sinuosity of the river. We also collect different shape of stone. Bourn Brook join to R.Cam, R.Rhee and Granta. The river system is in Cambridge. It is rural catchments. There have much wildlife like roach, pike, cow, perch and carp. The river begins north east of Henlow, where springs rise from the underlying chalk aquifer. This water-bearing chalk is the dominant geological factor in the area south and east of Cambridge, providing a natural base flow to the river. Rain percolates through the porous rock, emerging at the surface when the hard bands within prevent further downward penetration. Photographs Photo 1 (all photo by www.geocities.com/geography) There is a gentle valley, it is slumping and a collapsed river banks. ...read more.

Middle

Velocity in metres per second(10 divided by average time) Time taken in seconds 161 166 142 344 114.6 0.08 Result presentation Results analysis Site 1 Caxton Long axis Site 2 Long axis Toft 1 4.3cm 1 5cm 2 4.6cm 2 3.9cm 3 5.1cm 3 3.1cm 4 3.5cm 4 5.3cm 5 5.1cm 5 4.8cm 6 7.8cm 6 3.1cm 7 6.3cm 7 3.7cm 8 4.7cm 8 4.1cm 9 4.5cm 9 3.7cm 10 4.7cm 10 2.2cm The average pebble size at each site The average pebble size of Caxton is 5.06cm The average pebble size of Toft is 3.89cm The Average time of velocities result table Site no.1 1st run 2nd run 3rd run Total time in seconds Average time (total time divided by 3) Velocity in metres per second(10 divided by average time) Time taken in seconds 169 116 161 446 148.6 0.06 Site no.2 1st run 2nd run 3rd run Total time in seconds Average time (total time divided by 3) Velocity in metres per second(10 divided by average time) Time taken in seconds 161 166 142 344 114.6 0.08 A Fieldwork Measurements Width of channel (cm) ...read more.

Conclusion

Run: 1 2 3 Time:161 166 142 total: 344 Average time: 114.6 B Discharge Calculations The stream cross-section is plotted on graph paper (as above) Cross-section area: 160 squares X 23 square cm = 4000 square cm = 4000/10 = 0.4 square Velocity in per second = 10/114.6 = 0.087m per second Discharge = 0.087 X 0.4 = 0.034 cumecs Average discharge = 0.034 X 0.8 = 0.027 cumecs The river changed over the length, it got deeper and wider, also the river moved faster. It is because so much water will need more space to go through the river. The bed load didn't change anything. The pebbles get rounder and smaller because the current is swift.. The erosion will get more seriously. And there will have more deposition. If the water getting fast, the If the water getting fast, the momentum can make the erosion be serious. More water also will take more deposition. The valley changed from a steep v to a gently sloping one. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Hydrology & Fluvial Geomorphology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Hydrology & Fluvial Geomorphology essays

  1. Hydrology and Fluvial geomorphology. (Q&A)

    Q: Why do rivers meander? Suggested Answer The reasons why rivers start to meander are still uncertain, but meander formation seems to be closely linked to the occurrence of pools and riffles. Pools are fairly deep sections that have an efficient shape (high hydraulic radius)

  2. Study the downstream changes of Loughton Brook.

    One of my hypotheses was that the surface velocity would increase as the stream order increases. I think this will happen because river discharge usually increases downstream due to the drainage basin becoming bigger, and therefore the volume of water reaching the channel via tributaries, surface flow, through flow, and groundwater flow increasing.

  1. Edexcel Geography B Unit 3 Coursework

    1st Hypothesis: There is a gradual increase in the velocity downstream in the River Holford. Table 3.2 SITE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Dist. From Source (m) 20 220 480 560 1104 2987 4200 7727 Average Velocity (m/s)

  2. River cross sections

    We used two rivers to try and eliminate any chance of an anomaly in the readings/any outside elements that could affect results. We measured the width of each river across the bank and also the depth at many different points so as to be able to build up many cross sections.

  1. History Course Work Essay

    Greg and his agents decided waterpower was what they required because it was the most efficient kind of power at that time because steam power was still being developed. This meant they had to look for a sight with a suitable water supply, Styal was found.

  2. The characteristics of the Horsbere Brook vary along it length.

    the Horsbere Brook is a spring. A river is a drainage basin which is an area of land which is drained by a river and its tributaries. We have seen the Horsbere Brook which is a tributary of the River Severn.

  1. Geography investigation - The River Skirfare located in the Littondale region in the Yorkshire ...

    So the same weaknesses apply. See above. Hydraulic Radius. 26th March 2003 Two sections of river. One upstream (Halton Gill), the other downstream (Arncliffe), During the day, 11:00- 14:00 Will measure directly how efficient the river is. It is a measure of efficiently. Will help directly with the hypothesis.

  2. How does Loughton Brook change as it moves downstream?

    After collecting the results we see for any trends and use them to answer our key questions. Then we will see whether the data collected was enough to complete the investigation and to answer the set key questions. We could also explore other ways of improving my work.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work