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Case Study: Telford and Wrekin, Shropshire.

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Introduction

Case Study: Telford and Wrekin, Shropshire "It is a county of wide-ranging appeal both for residents and the many visitors who come each year, with outstanding natural beauty and great historic interest as well as modern developments." However, there are an increasing number of people moving to Shropshire for a permanent residency. Shropshire is England's largest inland county, covering an area of 1,347 square miles. To the west it, borders Wales and to the south, Herefordshire. In the north is Cheshire and to the east, Staffordshire. With a population of less than half a million, it is one of England's most sparsely populated counties and agriculture is an important part of the local economy. ...read more.

Middle

The graph shows the number of in and out-migrants entering and leaving Shropshire. Population An estimated 153,000 more people migrated to the United Kingdom in 2002 than migrated away. This net in-migration is slightly lower than the estimates for the previous three years. This has an inevitable effect on the UK as a whole as well as individual regions. The population pyramid above demonstrates the data for Telford and Wrekin and not just the rural area. However, it gives an idea of the ratio of males to females and age structure of the area compared to the United Kingdom average. Between 1991 and 2001, the population of the rural area grew by 1,883 people, which is 3.9% above the borough average. ...read more.

Conclusion

These are also above the English average and this shows that counter-urbanisation to rural areas and migration has not ceased being popular. Employment and Quality of Life * In 1991, 10.6% of the population worked in agriculture, forestry, fishing or some sort of primary industry. By 2001, it had fallen to 6.4%. * 13.7% of the people in the rural area worked from home, compared with 7.8% borough-wide. Also, 17.0% of people were self-employed. * The proportion of households in the rural area without access to a car was at 8.6%, which is less than half that of the borough. Also, 53.2% of households had access to two or more cars. * Below are a series of tables that reflect the types of employment and the living standards of people in the rural area. 1 Data from different sources may be have slight differences. ...read more.

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