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Coastal landforms and features are related to the rock type (geology) of the area - Discuss

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Introduction

Coastal landforms and features are related to the rock type (geology) of the area. To collect information for hypothesis1 we visited a number of places. These are all recorded by number on the geological map of the Isle of Purbeck. This also served as a location map (see M1 for details). * Man O War Cove * Lulworth Cove * North Swanage Bay * South Swanage Bay * Redend point * North Studland Beach * South Studland Beach * Sandbanks * Bournemouth * Durdle Door * Stair Hole * Old Harry's Rocks We used a sheet to record the information collected in each area. These included a grid reference, the landforms present, the rock type of that area, the rock hardness, the cliff height and cliff profile, if there was a cliff. To determine the grid reference we used a map of the area and noted the reference down in the classroom after we had returned from the beach. The rock type of each place visited and the name of the location were determined by the geological and location map of the Isle of Purbeck (see M1). ...read more.

Middle

Techniques used had both advantages and disadvantages. Advantages: * Gun clinometer - this was light so easy to take with us to the beach and also easy and quick to use. It is a fairly cheap piece of equipment and accurate enough for what we needed it for. It also enabled us to measure the height of the cliff in a safe manner rather than having for example to get someone to climb to the top of the cliff and dangle a tape measure to someone at the bottom so they could read off the result and jot it down. This would have been impossible most of the time anyway as there were no ways to get to the top of the cliff. * Simple scale for rock hardness - this method was quick, easy and provided simple clear results that were be easy to place on a graph but still relatively accurate. Results such as hard or fairly soft would have been unclear and impossible to plot on a graph. * Tape measure - this was quick, accurate and easy to use with simple results to calculate the cliff height and as did the gun clinometer provides a safe way to work out the heights of the cliffs back at the hostel. ...read more.

Conclusion

I will also use a scatter graph to show this but because there are only a few results it will not be very helpful in showing a relationship between the two. I could not have used a line graph as this is not continuous data. In view of this, I think that a bar chart is the best way to show the relationship. This shows a definite downward trend but because there are so few results it doesn't really tell us much. With the graph just as it is if we added results for all we know the trend could be lost and this would show that there was no relationship after all. However to see if there is a relationship on a scatter graph we can use a method called spearman's rank but on this particular graph it wouldn't be of any use anyway as a minimum of 10 results are needed for it to be accurate. Therefore we will not be using this method on this particular graph but we will later on in hypothesis 2. Otherwise this graph clearly shows that as a rock gets softer the cliff it is made out of becomes smaller. ...read more.

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