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Coastal Management strategies need to consider not only physical processes but also factors associated with human geography.

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Introduction

Coastal Management strategies need to consider not only physical processes but also factors associated with human geography. Analyse why this is the case. Coastal management is a means of controlling development and change in the coastal zone and undertaking work according to agreed principles and criteria. By taking into account physical and human geography factors and people who come from the local areas views will help to ensure that there is good coastal management strategy. There are usually three stages in a management strategy, understanding the reason for the problem, undertaking work to resolve the problem or reduce the effects of the problem and to improve prediction and make a contingency plan. Physical processes are things that occur on the earth's surface, coastal processes are things that occur around the coastline examples of this would be erosion, deposition; sub aerial processes and long shore drift. ...read more.

Middle

best in relation to physical factors the chosen scheme will be the best scheme to limit or stop the thing that is occurring. They are likely to take into account the rock type in the area the height of land, shape of the land and the cause of the problem. Possible and reasonable solutions would be put forward and the best solution in relation to the physical geography is likely to be put in place. On top of the physical considerations come the human considerations these are things such as are they going to cause unsightly views is it going to cause conflict between local people and the local government. Human Factors that effect whether a coastal management scheme is put into place would be things such as, how many people will it be protecting, what type of properties will it be protecting, (the more expensive properties that are in the area the more likely it is that the area will have a coastal management scheme put in place.) ...read more.

Conclusion

Decline in the number of various plant species in the area. What is being done to overcome the problem, restoration of the dunes by the replanting of some plant species, planting maram grass, which holds the dunes place as they have a good rooting system, fencing of areas to stop people using them and establishing footpaths. This has been done by laying duck boards to slow down erosion problem produced by users of the dunes. Increasing the number of car parks and the improvement of existing car parks. Rotating the use of the car parks. The contingency plan is to educate people about the possible effects of inappropriate use of the dunes. This is being done through guided walks, sign posting of areas and information leaflets for the public. This has not caused conflict between local people but has cost them money. It is helping to preserve the area and is a suitable management strategy in respect of physical and human means. This is the balance that all management strategies for the coast should achieve. ...read more.

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Overall this is a reasonable attempt at the question. It shows an understanding of the key words and phrases in the question. It could be improved by having a better structure, more detail in the case study, fewer grammatical errors and a more substantial conclusion.

Marked by teacher Nigel Fisher 15/02/2012

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