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Counter Urbanisation

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Introduction

Counter urbanisation and Suburbanisation Counter-urbanisation 1) Explain the term 'counter urbanisation'. The movement of people and employment away from large cities to smaller settlements. 2) Suggest reasons to explain why people would want to move away from large towns and cities. There are four main reasons as to why people might want to move away from larger cities: 1. The increase in car ownership over the last 40 years means people are more mobile. This has led to an increase in commuting. Also, the growth in information technology (E-mail, faxes and video conferencing) means more people can work from home. 2. Urban areas are becoming increasing unpleasant place to live. This is the result of pollution, crime and traffic congestion. 3. More people tend to move when they retire. 4. New business parks on the edge of cities (on Greenfield sites) mean people no longer have to travel to the city centre. People now prefer to live on the outskirts of the city to be near where they work. 3) Which groups of people would be more likely to move away and why. People who work in the office using ICT and the elder people are the groups of people who would be most likely to move away. ...read more.

Middle

The chalk pit has been turned into an area where children can enjoy themselves. This is good for the community. Overall, the land use has modernised the village a little bit. Type and design of houses The housing in and around the village has become more modernised. Council estates made housing more affordable which drew in even more potential residents of Thurston village. This might possibly lead to an increase in the villages wealth. Range of services and amenities There has been an increase in services and amenities. In 1884 there were only few services and amenities. However, in 1994 these services spread out all over the village and new ones were brought in. Age and occupation of inhabitants It is most likely that the age range of the inhabitants of the village will be the same as any other place. This is because it is mainly office workers and ICT users that move out of the city. These people will probably take their families with them. Also, the other main migrants are the elder people. They usually want to get away from the pollution and noise; if they have families then they might move with them. Or really caring sons/daughters might move with their old parents to look after them, taking their families with them too. ...read more.

Conclusion

Property developers would prefer to build on Greenfield sites because: o Most British people want to own their own home, complete with garden, set in a rural or semi-rural location. o People are healthier and generally have a better quality of life in rural areas. o At present, for every three people moving into cities, five more out into the countryside. o Greenfield sites are cheaper to build on than Brownfield sites as they are likely to have lower land values and are less likely to be in need of clearing-up operations. 6) Suggest reasons to explain why conservation groups and people living in villages want the houses to be built on Brownfield sites. A few reasons as to why conservation groups and people living in villages want the houses to be built on Brownfield sites are as follows: o There are already 3/4 of a million unoccupied houses in cities that could be upgraded o A further 1.3 million could be created by either subdividing large houses or using empty space above shops and offices o According to the database, 1.3 million homes could be built on vacant and derelict land and another 0.3 million by re-using old industrial and commercial premises. o Urban living reduces the need to use the car and maintains services, especially retailing, in city centres. ?? ?? ?? ?? Geography ...read more.

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