• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Define the term agricultural productivity and describe how it varies between different parts of the world.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Agriculture Essay Define the term agricultural productivity and describe how it varies between different parts of the world. Agricultural productivity is the term given to the output of agriculture in terms of the inputs such as the capital and labour. Therefore as a fairly general comment, this could be defined as the efficiency of the farm. This varies in different parts of the world, and this can be put down mainly to the amount of capital the farm owner has. Although there are other factors involved a lot of them are dependent on the amount of capital available. For example in MEDCs such as the UK a lot of farms are owned by wealthy people who can afford to buy machinery. This enables the farm to run more efficiently as the processes on the farm can be completed at a quicker rate and therefore the labour efficiency becomes better as one person can perform more work in one day than if no machinery was available. This in turn then saves the employee money as less staff have to be hired so therefore the wage bill is lower. On the other hand in many LEDCs many farms are used to provide food for the family of the owner, and not primarily to create a profit (although this may occur during a good harvest). ...read more.

Middle

This would be because each plant needs a certain amount of water to grow to its full potential, therefore if there is a limited amount of water the farmer has the choice of planting lots of plants and none of them reaching their full potential or he could plant less plants so they could all reach their potential. As well as precipitation the relief of an area plays an important part in what can be grown. The steeper a slope the less that can be grown. This means that terracing is often used to provide flat areas of land on what would otherwise be sloped land. this provides greater productivity for that area of land as more plants can be grown and the land is easier to work. This method however is found more in LEDCs than MEDCs on intensive farms as machinery cannot easily be used. Also the addition of fertiliser could aid the growth of plants and therefore productivity. This could help due to the fact that plants require many nutrients to help their growth and these could be provided by the fertilisers. This is useful wherever plants are grown as no soil contains perfect concentrations of all of the nutrients required. ...read more.

Conclusion

The use of machinery greatly increases the speed at which things can be done, and although this does not increase productivity on an area of land, it means that more land can be farmed in the same space of time which therefore would increase the productivity. Many of the methods mentioned above are expensive and are used in extensive farming. In LEDCs however they may not be able o afford to do many of the things mentioned above. A way around this problem is to farm the land intensively, and this means that more crops can be grown in a smaller space as they have more attention from the farmer. This would cause the productivity to be greater because the yield per area would be greater on an intensive farm than it would be on an extensive farm. One problem with this is that although the productivity per area would be higher the productivity per labourer would be lower. Many methods of increasing productivity are used around the world, and some work better than others. However it is not possible to say that one is better than the other as it depends on the factors effecting a particular area of land and this alters tremendously around the world. Therefore before any method is applied the farmer must assess what is required, and which one would suit his farm best to increase agricultural productivity. Mark Johnston 01/05/2007 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Production - Location & Change section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Production - Location & Change essays

  1. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of pest control In the world ...

    Another problem generating from the use of pesticides is bioaccumulation. This is when herbivores feed on plants which are contaminated with compounds such as chemical pesticides; the compounds tend to become concentrated in the fatty tissues of the animal. In the animal, these compounds are not broken down and are

  2. The Role and Importance of Agriculture In the Carribean. Organisations involved in its ...

    In cases where the farms are locally owned the profits remain in the country and help with its development. On these farms soil and crop management are uniform, since they are dealing with one crop. This repeating of crop and soil management practices can have negative effects such as: *

  1. Different methods of pest control and their environmental issues.

    Home gardeners often use oils from lemon, lime and orange peels. These oils keep pests like caterpillars, aphids and flies from attacking valuable plants. Biochemical pesticides include substances, such as insect sex pheromones. Pheromones are chemicals that insects produce to communicate with each other.

  2. The Multiplier effect explained and with examples.

    To conclude, it can be said that all regions cannot be successful because the success depends on many important factors, whereas not all regions can offer the most part of those factors. For that reason it can be quite clear why such areas as the South Wales and the M4 Corridor are more successful than the others.

  1. Why have agricultural surpluses become a feature of many countries in the developed world ...

    in cold areas, seeds that can tolerate a shorter growing season and in dry areas, seeds that are more drought resistant. Also, offsetting the effects of problematic physical factors e.g. in areas of unreliable rainfall supplying irrigation water. This intensification of farming, by making the land produce more by increased

  2. Physical and human processes can be linked to explain the deficit of food production ...

    This also limits the amount of food and grazing land that is available for livestock. The effects of desertification are made ever worse by over cultivation, overgrazing and an increasing population. The little precipitation that the Sahel does experience is usually severe, and as the arid land is usually impermeable

  1. What is meant by the term core and periphery?

    This is not removing anything from the periphery but merely adding to the standard of living and services in the periphery. However with more capital it will create more pull factors that will encourage rural migration into the core so labour will be lost along with taxes etc.

  2. Industrial Revolution.

    More than 14,000 taxpayers escaped an audit by the IRD in the year to June 1997 because of a shortage of staff, its annual report has revealed. It managed to complete only 67,980 out of a budgeted 82,450 investigations. The shortfall was due to the lack of audit staff the report said.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work