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Describe and account for the different types of weathering that effect two types of rock

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Introduction

Cristina Clark 12A Describe and account for the different types of weathering that effect two types of rock Weathering is the atmospheric action on rocks by physical, chemical or biological processes; there is no movement of the rock involved. Lithology refers to the physical characteristics of a rock, as each rock is different, such as its vulnerability to weathering, its permeability and its structure, they greatly influence the landforms that can be produced by weathering. Carboniferous limestone and granite can show how characteristics affect different rocks, as they are two of the main types of rock that produce distinctive types of landform and scenery. Both granite and carboniferous limestone are vulnerable to weathering, as they have air gaps, which water can penetrate into. ...read more.

Middle

large pore spaces allow rapid water movement as there is less resistance. Porosity is lowest in those that are fine-grained, such as granite. Secondary permeability occurs in rocks that have joints and fissures along which water can flow, such as carboniferous limestone. Impermeable rocks such as granite, neither store water nor allow it to pass through it. The crystals in granite fit together more closely than rounded grams, limiting the amount of water held and inhibiting the motion of moisture. Granite therefore has a higher drainage density than carboniferous limestone. Granite has fewer joints and bedding planes, which means that it is more resistant to weathering and erosion. However carboniferous limestone is more jointed, less compact and softer, resulting in it being more vulnerable to weathering. ...read more.

Conclusion

As it continued to cool, it contracted and a series of cracks originated. These cracks have been further enlarged by pressure release. Although it is hard rock, granite is subject to both physical and chemical weathering (the break down of rock surfaces and weathering that involves reactions on the rock). Frost shattering widens the joints, which hold water- (the colder temperatures of the north mean that the water can freeze into the cracks, and as it cools it expands forcing the cracks to become larger). While granular disintegration is caused by the rates of expansion and cooling of minerals. The spacing in the joints is crucial in tor formation, core stones have been left where they were closely packed and weathering was more active. The rounded nature of these cores stones especially in tropical regions is caused by spheroidal weathering, which is a form of exfoliation. ...read more.

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