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Describe and examine the landforms that are produced as a result of costal deposition in an area you have studied.

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Introduction

`Describe and examine the landforms that are produced as a result of costal deposition in an area you have studied. Deposition is defined as 'the laying down of sediments, produced by weathering and erosion of landmasses...'. Deposition occurs when velocity decreases and therefore suspended sediment can no longer be transported. There are four main landforms that are resulting form landforms, beaches, spits and tombolos, forelands and barrier islands. The area that I have studied is the Vale of Glamorgan Coastline form Merthyr Mawr Warren to Breaksea Point and within this area there are many depositional features. Most of the rock in the area was formed during the Jurassic period approximately 150 million years ago. Most of the rock formed in this period was limestone and shale. ...read more.

Middle

There are also many storm beaches found along this area, for example at Ogmore and Tresilian Bay. Storm beaches are created during storms when there are high-energy waves. Large material is thrown high up onto the beach creating berms. This leads to grading, with the largest boulders at the furthest point from the sea, and the finer material closer. This is caused by the strong swash carrying the large rocks further however there is not enough energy to bring them back as the backwash is weaker due to the percolation between the large rocks. The berms will remain until another storm event of the same magnitude occurs which will add to them or remove them. Periods of relative stability will allow the berms to remain as a feature of the storm beach, however they are not ephemeral. ...read more.

Conclusion

The process of long-shore drift is carrying the material from the west, however there may be further material added to the spit from the River Thaw (Afon Col-Huw), which emerges here. These are not the only contributors; the final contributor to the accumulation of material at the spit is Breaksea Point to the East. At Breaksea Point the coastline changes direction and long-shore drift is unable to continue, this results in the formation of tidal currents moving from the east to the west and carrying more material with them, this material is then also deposited at Col-Huw Point. As I have shown above, there are many landforms produced as a result of coastal deposition and from the examples given you can see that it plays a great role in the area I have studied. Pauline Mahon - 1 - Physical Geography - Mrs. Kingsford ...read more.

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