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Eastbourne.

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Introduction

Jennie Lace 10c Friday 21st March 2003 Eastbourne Project 1. Introduction My hypotheses are: * Longshore drift is from the Southwest. * Sediment size increases with distance from the shoreline. Eastbourne is a large coastal town in East Sussex. Eastbourne Eastbourne's main function is tourism, but it is also a residential town. Many retired people live there in the high numbers of houses and care homes. There are many hotels, especially on the sea front. The reason that we chose to do our study in Eastbourne was because it has a shingle beach, which means we can measure the pebbles near and further from the coastline. There are also groynes which, if we measure the distance from the top of them down to the beach, can help us find out from which direction longshore drift is. There is a shingle beach in Eastbourne, and that part of coastline is at risk from coastal erosion, so some ways of slowing this erosion down have been put in place by the council. Along the beach there are wooden groynes placed at regular intervals, which help prevent the lots of the shingle being transported along the coastline due to longshore drift. Longshore drift is the transport of sand and pebbles along the coast by waves. Waves often approach the coastline at an angle (which is determined by the direction of the prevailing wind). The sand and pebbles carried by the waves roll back down the slope at right angles to the coastline, due to gravity. These sand grains and pebbles will be transported by waves to the next point in the coastline and so on, and this results in the beach material being transported along the coastline by the action of the waves. Here is a diagram to show how longshore drift erodes the coastline in Eastbourne. Another way in which the council in Eastbourne tries to manage the retreat of the coastline is by replenishing the shingle which makes up the beach. ...read more.

Middle

However, groyne 2 did not really fit with my prediction, as the results did not seem to have a positive correlation. For example, the second result was lower than the first, and the next was higher, then lower, then lower, and then higher. Groyne 3 fitted in with my prediction, as every single one of the results was higher than the previous one. Therefore, overall graph 4a supported my prediction that pebble size increases with distance from the shoreline. On the graph for the downdrift (4b, on tracing paper) the results were, overall, much less like I had predicted. Although Groyne 1's downdrift pebble sizes did not follow the exact pattern of each average pebble size getting greater with distance from the shoreline, there was an overall positive correlation. But for Groyne 2, that is not the case, and the results have no real correlation, as the average pebble sizes go up and down, rather than increasing with distance from the shoreline. The pebble sizes for Groyne 3 also have no correlation, meaning that overall, graph 4b doesn't support the hypothesis. I also plotted the same data in a different way, by using 3 divided bar charts for each of the groynes, with tracing paper over the top so that there were 6 bar charts in total. Like the scatter graph, the divided bar charts showed clearly that Groyne 1 had the 'best' results in that they supported my prediction. I did a key to show which lengths of pebbles were represented by each colour. The smallest pebbles were represented by pink, the next biggest by red, then yellow, then green, then blue and finally, the largest was represented by purple. In Graph 5a, which was for the updrift side of Groyne 1, the bars started off being just pink and red, then more yellow and green was introduced gradually and the last bar was made up of just green, blue and purple blocks, showing that overall the pebble size did increase with distance from the shoreline. ...read more.

Conclusion

To extend the hypothesis we could go to one pebble beach with groynes and one without to see if pebbles size increases with distance from the shore in the same way on beaches without groynes. We could also study a beach that isn't on the south coast and see where, if anywhere, longshore drift is coming from. Eastbourne Project by Jennie Lace 10c Contents Introduction Page 1 Method Page 4 Data presentation Page 6-12 Data Interpretation Page 13 Evaluation Page 16 Additional work Page 18 Field Sketch (High and Over) Page 19 Field Sketch (River Cuckmere) Page 20 Field Sketch (River Meander) Page 21 Field Sketch (Holywell Retreat) Page 22 Bibliography Page 23 Additional Work As well as studying the beach in Eastbourne, we also studied some aspects of human geography in Eastbourne and the surrounding area. To look at and compare land use in Eastbourne, we conducted a land use transect. Each group was given a group of buildings and we had to note down what the building was used for and how many stories it had. This was to see if land use in Eastbourne is affected by distance from the coast. On the journey back from Eastbourne, we stopped at two places. Broadfield is a small group of shops, and Crawley is a town with a large shopping area with many shops. We wanted to investigate if there was a higher proportion of shops selling comparison goods (inexpensive, not bought very frequently, e.g. furniture, electrical appliances) in Crawley than at Broadfield. To find this out we carried out land use transects at each site and compared them. We also wanted to see if people travel further to shop in Crawley town centre than Broadfield. We interviewed as many people as possible at both of the locations, asking them questions such as where they live, how often they shop there, and what they had come to buy. We then recorded their answers in a table. ...read more.

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