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Evaluate the population control policies of China and the state of Kerala in South West India

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Introduction

Evaluate the population control policies of China and the state of Kerala in South West India China's population has increased rapidly since 1949, and when the world's population passed the 6 billion mark in October 1999, China's population represented more than 1/5 of this total. Today, China's population exceeds 1.25 billion, putting the countries population density at 128 persons per km2. However, the population is now an aging one, putting China's economy at risk. This population pattern is unarguably a direct result of the family planning policies, which include the 'one-child' population control system put in place by the Chinese government in 1979. They did this due to a dramatic 2.4% growth in 1960 that caused the population to rise to 900 million, putting huge demand on the countries resources. The aim of the strategy was to stabilise the country's population at 1.2 billion by 2000 and reduce it to 700 million by 2010. This figure was believed by the Government to be the optimum size; a sustainable equilibrium between people and resources. The Government offered incentives to encourage Chinese citizens to comply with the rule and only have one child. ...read more.

Middle

In comparison, the policy has introduced "little emperor" syndrome, where the male children are spoilt and as a consequence, overweight. The aging population is also a significant problem that continues today even now the one child policy has been relaxed. Worries are that there are too few young people to support the elderly in China. There were 65million people over 65 in the country in 1990 and it is predicted that by 2020 this figure will have risen another 102 million. There have been many problems with the population control policies of China. Nevertheless the population has been significantly reduced and the country's population is beginning to level out. The aim to reduce the population to below a billion is unlikely though, and today, China's government is still looking for a solution to this problem. China may still be the world's most populous nation, but India follows close behind. The country's population is estimated to be around one billion and it has one of the highest population growth rates in the world. In the last 10 years its population has increased by 181 million. ...read more.

Conclusion

These are wide spread and easy to access in the Southern state. The final population control policy that has been put into place in Kerala is an improvement in the status of women. Women in the state are no longer seen as a burden but regarded as an asset. Traditionally in India when a woman gets married the family have to pay money (a dowry) to the bridegroom's family. In Kerala, it is the bridegroom's family who pay a dowry to the bride's family. This control policy is seen by many as a much more sustainable resolution to overpopulation that that of China. The main reason it has been so successful is because Kerala's population is not opposed to the strategy. They see it as fair and it helps them live a better quality of life. It may not have worked in china, but Kerala's population pattern does say something for its success. The state does not have an aging population, neither does it have an unmanageable about of dependant young people. Kerala's success may infact encourage the rest of India to use similar policies, because if it does not the country could end up in a situation of overpopulation that moral strategies such as free contraception cannot resolve. ...read more.

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