• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18
  19. 19
    19
  20. 20
    20
  21. 21
    21

Find out in which ways a river changes from its source to its mouth.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Rivers Coursework Contents Introduction Rivers Coursework Main Aim: To find out in which ways a river changes from its source to its mouth. We traveled to the west coast of Wales to find out how a river changes from its source to its mouth. We were situated in the small rural village of Tal-y-bont, which was near the town of Aberystwyth. The river that we decided to test out with our hypothesis and find out our aim on was the river Einion. The river Einion is a tributary to the river Dovey. The river is roughly 4 miles long and 12 miles from Aberystwyth. Aberystwyth is mainly a tourist-based town, situated between three vast hills, equipped with many facilities for tourists but it is also renowned for its Castle ruins and stony beaches and also a large spit at Cardigan Bay. Aberystwyth is the home for the University of Wales and the National Library of Wales. The landscape of Aberystwyth is very hilly, with many interlocking spurs and V shaped valleys in the area. In order to test and prove our hypothesis, we conducted tests on the river Einion at five different points along the river to show us the changes it has made from its source to its mouth. This is where the river Einion is situated on a map of Wales River Dovey Aberystwyth River Einion Site 5 Site 4 Site 3 Site 2 Site 1 These are the five sites that we collected data from and proved our hypothesis at. Hypothesis * As the depth of the river increases from source to mouth, the sediment size will decrease. ...read more.

Middle

Where the water met the ruler the measurement was taken and recorded. To make sure that the reading was accurate, two people from the group viewed the reading and agreed on the measurement. The rule was twisted so that it ran parallel with the river; making it more streamlined which made the measurement easy to take. The people taking the reading were downstream from the rule so they did not interrupt the flow of water. The bottom of the meter rule, marked 0, was placed at the riverbed. Once again boulders became an inconvenience towards the top of the river, because they were larger, so we moved them out of the way and placed the rule against the shingle below. We repeated this for the seven points across the river and at the four other sites. The depth was taken to 1 decimal place. Sediment Size This is the size of the deposits in the river such as boulders and rocks. Finding the sediment sizes allows me to continue with the hypothesis that: As the depth of the river increases from source to mouth, the sediment size will decrease. To find the results, the river was split into the same 7 points as when finding the depth. From each of these points we took 3 rocks from the riverbed. We measured the longest side and then threw them over the bank so that we would not be able to pick that rock up again by mistake. The person picking up the rocks, tended to pick up the bigger rocks as they could only feel the rocks that were coming out of the water, not see them. ...read more.

Conclusion

Where we measured to the edge of the bank, maybe we should have measured to the point where the water comes into contact with the bank. Also, we may have not been measuring straight across the river and had the tape at an angle, this would of given us extra distance that may of affected our results. From looking at secondary sources, the width of the river should definitely of got bigger as we reached the mouth. * As the velocity increases, the gradient will decrease. This was not conducted very well in accordance to our results or the river didn't give us the results we were looking for. From my graph, I can see that the velocity started to increase overall from site 1 to site 2. However this pattern did not continue as site 3 turned out to have the lowest velocity of all 5 sites. Site 4 was fairly high and then site 5 became very low. The strange results may have been because the sites were not equally spaced out or that the area in which the equipment was used was deep or shallow. The gradient was slightly more successful, with sites 1,3 and 5 following a pattern and with sites 2 and 4 becoming anomalies. I put these down to the fact that we did not go deep enough into the riverbed; instead we stayed towards the surface of a layer of shingle. We should have maybe gone deeper. Or maybe it was down to the person who was taking the readings, as on the equipment they used, there were several marks from where to record the data from. Maybe this was the case. Russell Ainsworth Rivers Coursework ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Hydrology & Fluvial Geomorphology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Hydrology & Fluvial Geomorphology essays

  1. Hydrology and Fluvial geomorphology. (Q&A)

    As these processes of erosion and deposition continue to occur, the outside of the meander is eroded further, more so in the direction of the river flow. i.e. if the river is flowing to its mouth southwards, the southern end of the meander is eroded more.

  2. Study the downstream changes of Loughton Brook.

    Two ranging poles and a tape measure / 1m ruler are required. Load Shape The load that I used for observing the shape was pebbles. From each site ten pebbles were collected and were estimated according to their angularity or roundness as well as their sphericity (according to the Powers Roundness Index).

  1. Geography Coursework: Epping Forest

    This type of graph was used because it is easy to see the shape and size of the channel so it is easier to compare the average channel size of each site. Hydraulic radius - the hydraulic radius increases at each site.

  2. How a river changes from source to mouth

    The longer time goes on the more the river erodes and therefore the valley becomes deeper and wider. The Middle Course In the Middle Course loses velocity as the gradient lessens and volume of water increases when tributaries join the river.

  1. My hypotheses are:The character of the course of the River Bollin will change along ...

    4.6 6.4 6.6 5.1 5.2 3.5 5.2 2.1 2.5 3.4 Depth(cm) 2.1 3.1 3.6 3.2 1.8 3.4 3.8 1.6 1.4 1.5 Volume(cm�) 49.26 126.98 166.32 58.75 44.928 48.79 142.27 4.368 7.7 20.4 Roundness classification (1-6) 5 4 4 4 4 6 5 5 6 6 Mean Volume of bed load=

  2. This project will study about the way the river Conwy in north Wales changes ...

    Little bit lateral erosion e) Meanders f) Flood plain can be seen g) The area is marshy h) I found there is a big slip off slope i) I found there are sand stone j) Still turbulent flow k) Low friction l) Water flow rapids m) Erosion (hydraulic action, attrition)

  1. The river Gwaun: Investigating how the course of the river changes from the source ...

    Overhang There are a few examples of overhang on the River Gwaun, particularly in Sites 3 & 1. The most prominent are in Site 3. Overhang is formed when the river erodes part of the riverbank but not the top part, thus causing an overhanging bit of grass/earth/etc.

  2. Geography investigation - The River Skirfare located in the Littondale region in the Yorkshire ...

    The previous two graphs show the size of the material at each location in a lot more detail. They show the exact size of each stone that was recorded along the profile of the river Skirfare both upstream and downstream.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work