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Find out the geological appearance, structure and composition at Peacehaven, Newhaven and Rottingdean.

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Introduction

Index Page 1: Cover page Page 2: Index And Introduction Page 3: Peacehaven profile Page 4: Newhaven West profile Page 5: Newhaven East profile Page 6: Rottingdean profile Page 7: Explanation to Peacehaven profile Page 8: Explanation to Newhaven West and East and Rottingdean profiles Page 9: Data and Calculations and explaining the problem of using an average figure Page 10: Graph representing data collected Page 11: Problems of cliff retreat + solutions Page 12: More solutions Page 13: More solutions + Different views on the solutions Introduction In this coursework we hope to achieve many aims and we will accomplish these by visiting cliffs at Peacehaven, East Newhaven, West Newhaven and Rottingdean. Our aims are to find out the appearance, structure and composition at Peacehaven, Newhaven and Rottingdean. What the wave processes and types evident at each site are. How wave processes and cliff characteristics affect the appearance of the cliffs. What effects the physical processes on these cliff lines had on the people in the locality and what the likely consequences are and what steps could be taken to reduce the erosion hazard in these areas and what the cost and benefits are for local communities. ...read more.

Middle

3mm 2mm 2mm 6.5 Metres 2050-2075 3mm 3mm 2mm 3mm 3mm 7 Metres 2075-2100 3mm 3mm 3mm 2mm 3mm 7 Metres We can also use this information to estimate the average land lost per year: _ Year Average Metres Lost Average metres lost per year 1976-2000 7.5 Metres 7.5/24 = 0.31 2000-2025 7 Metres 7/25 = 0.28 2025-2050 6.5 Metres 6.5/25 = 0.26 2050-2075 7 Metres 7/25 = 0.28 2075-2100 7 Metres 7/25 = 0.28 Problems of estimating the future rate of erosion and the problem of using an average figure One problem when trying to predict the future rate of erosion is human intervention. Man could invent a machine to slow down or stop erosion and would therefore make the predicted figures inaccurate. Also due to global warming we could have bigger and more violent storms that would then result in a quicker rate of erosion. The problem of using an average figure is that one-year the sea could be eroding an area of very hard rock, e.g. granite, and would therefore be slow. Whereas during another year the sea is eroding some very soft rock, e.g. clay, the rate of erosion will be much quicker. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also it is not necessarily hugely effective as the sediment that is taken from the seabed can make the sea deeper, so the waves get bigger and therefore wave action erodes the beach more quickly. Gabions These are a short-term solution to this major problem. They are very cheap, usually costing about �350. They are metal cages filled with rocks. Although they are susceptible to rust and damage in bad weather, they are a very effective, cheap, short-term solution. Breakwaters These are very effective especially on wide beaches and allow some of the shore drifts to continue. However they have to be built deep in the water and are hence fairly expensive. Recent improvements are oil drums and old tyres floating parallel to the shore. This is much cheaper and an effective wave energy absorber and a useful way of recycling. Different views of solutions to cliff retreat People who live near to an unprotected area of cliff retreat will be very interested in any possible solution to the problem. However people who live further inland may not want the council to spend considerable amounts of money on cliff protection. Additionally people who live further up the coast will probably be adverse to these ideas as it is possible that they may experience an increased rate of erosion near where they live. Robert Ashley ...read more.

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