• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12

FOREIGN OBJECT DAMAGE (FOD) PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT IN THE DEPLOYED ENVIRONMENT

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

FOREIGN OBJECT DAMAGE (FOD) PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT IN THE DEPLOYED ENVIRONMENT by Nick Moore Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Extended Campus Travis AFB Resident Center July 2004 ABSTRACT Writer: Nick Moore Title: Foreign Object Damage (FOD) Prevention and Management in the Deployed Environment Institution: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Degree: Master of Aeronautical Science Year: 2004 As a result of the United States involvement in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) many Air Force aircraft have been forced to operate in austere and rugged airfields. Force multiplying, rapid global mobility, and overall airpower are directly related to the military's ability to operate in the deployed environment. Although this mission is performed everyday and may not seem like a big deal, what is the impact to Air Force assets that continue to perform these operations on a daily basis? How can the Air Force prevent and minimize the hazards of Foreign Object Damage in these environments? This paper will attempt to analyze and answer these questions in further detail. INTRODUCTION Foreign Object Damage has been part of accidents and unscheduled maintenance reports since the earliest days of flight. But the problem of foreign objects really came into focus for the military with the high operations tempo of Air Force aircraft to the war zone environment, supporting the war against terrorism and the liberation of Iraqi. I had a chance to see these operations first hand while deployed to Kuwait City International Airport (KCIA) ...read more.

Middle

There are many causes of FOD, but the two main contributors are poor housekeeping and poor work habits (Clover, 2003). From my recent experience at KCIA, I learned the importance of combating FOD and developing a program to ensure FOD prevention is always in the minds of every single member that works on or around the flight line. From the one stripe Airman that turns the wrench to fix the aircraft to the Flight Commander or even Squadron Commander, who is in charge of making the overarching decisions for the entire squadron, FOD is everyone's responsibility. And this is where the story begins. In the desert terrain the wind blows day and night and you hardly have time for a breather when it comes to FOD prevention. Often times in a wartime atmosphere things or shall I say FOD, is overlooked because everyone is trying to get the mission done. There is so much emphasis on pushing the pallets, loading cargo, getting the passengers on the plane, and doing it all on a certain timeline. Sometimes a little trash on the runway or ramp might get overlooked and people might say, "ahhh, it's not going hurt anything, we're trying to get a job done here". However, this is one of the worst mistakes someone can make and its one of the most often made in the deployed environment. It really does not take much to severely damage or bring down an aircraft due to poor FOD prevention and management. ...read more.

Conclusion

As my time at KCIA was coming to an end, the final stages to the FOD plan were being implemented by the new personnel that were coming into replace us, so we could return home. A good effort had been made in a short timeframe to reduce the risk but there was and is still much to be done. Inspection, maintenance, and coordination for the FOD plan had all when fairly smooth but there was one ingredient missing to ensure this plan did not fail and lasted through all the swap outs. That ingredient was training. The new folks that came in to replace us realized that and quickly added it to list FOD program. Initial and refresher awareness training were required for most personnel so education will be the cornerstone to the success of the FOD prevention program. Placing posters in work centers and on bulletin boards and rotating them regulary can educate and motivate. Initial and reoccurring training was now taking place and ensured the stability and effectiveness of the prevention effort. SUMMARY Sometimes in the deployed environment, you have to think outside the box and you have to slow down long enough to realize the mission needs to go forward but it must go forward safely. The key to FOD prevention and control is constant vigilance and immediate action to remove the hazards from areas where planes, equipment, or personnel often encounter. The mission, especially in deployed or austere locations, depends largely on air assets being fully mission capable. That can only happen when training, inspection, maintenance, and coordination come together and everyone does his or her part to prevent FOD. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Environmental Management section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Environmental Management essays

  1. Topic: Critically contrast the approach to organisations of the classical management theorists with that ...

    He also found that increasing size promotes structural differentiation, but at a decreasing rate. Referring to Argyris's critique, Robbins and Barnwell (2002) noted the limitation of Blau's theory. The critical point is that Blau choosed the government agency as his subject of research.

  2. The Environment: Whose Responsibility?

    make to environmental policies can result in a big difference when translated to the national or even worldwide scale. In the same way a small change for each individual, such as recycling any recyclable goods, can end up making a huge difference when everyone in the country does it.

  1. To what extent are cold environments fragile environments and how far does this affect ...

    However the threat of tourism and scientific research laboratories on the continent is growing each year. On Antarctica there are over 50 scientific research stations, 2 of these are British, however not one of them have a permanent base. This is due to the Antarctic treaty where no lasting claims

  2. Critically contrast the approach to organisations of the classical management theorists with that of ...

    work organization was more formalized and mechanistic and more according to the prescriptions of classical management. Yet, Woodward (1980) dealt with relatively narrow production oriented (unit, mass and process) technology. Robbins and Barnwell (2002) noted that the influence of information technology on structure is inconclusive because it seems to be more widely used as a productive device than Woodward suggested.

  1. The main aim of hazard management should be to reduce the effects of hazards, ...

    It is recorded that before the building of the dam, there was frequent flooding at the low lying areas of the river during spring. While physical methods can be employed to prevent the occurrence of these isolated hazards like floods and landslides, large scale hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis and wind storms cannot be prevented.

  2. Critically evaluate the view that understanding the multi-disciplinary nature Organisational Behaviour is essential to ...

    There are three main areas of the study of behaviour: psychology, sociology and anthropology. There are other, more obscure subjects, such as political science, which intertwine with these three, however, it is these primary drivers which have made the most important contribution to the subject of organisational behaviour.

  1. The Impact of Man on the Environment.

    These dissolve in rain to form nitric acid. The nitric acid when washed down into the grounds reacts with rocks forming nitrates. Nitrogen in primary producer food chains Nitrates formed by lighting, or applied to the soil in fertilisers are absorbed by plant roots.

  2. Free essay

    Health & The Environment

    A spokeswoman for The National Asthma Campaign said 'Many asthma sufferers say pollution triggers their asthma.' 'However, there have been very few specific studies which have shown that air pollution causes asthma. It is difficult to prove.' (BBC Health online (16th Sept 2003)).

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work