• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Hand-Dug Wells in Ghana are an example of small scale, local,

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Hand-Dug Wells in Ghana are an example of small scale, local, sustainable development projects. Describe the advantages of this scheme Hand-dug wells are an alternative to collecting muddy, diseased water a long way away. Here are some advantages of having this kind of access to this type of water: o Less time is spent collecting water from far away so people have more time on their hands. Children can go to school and receive education which means they can eventually get better jobs which could in the long-term help Ghana to develop. Adults can have more time on their hands. This may enable them to get a job and earn more money for their family which could improve the quality of their life. They could spend more time preparing food which may give the family a more balanced diet enabling them to live a long and healthy life. Young children can be looked after and if they are ill they have time to nurse them back to health. Without the journey to fetch water people feel much less tired giving them more energy for other things. o If there is access to clean water and diseases are not likely to be spread around, people are more likely to apply for jobs in the village. ...read more.

Middle

For example a large project is likely to be located at a place where it is going to be an advantage to industries as well as the locals. If locals are living near industries then there is probably a higher quality of life than in remote villages where people have a lower quality of life. Small projects benefit the people who need it. They are much more reliable and are easy to be sustained. People who perhaps agree with this theory could be amongst: o The locals of the village where the small scale project has been situated. Something as small as a hand-dug water pipe can benefit the village in many aspects. The villagers feel it is more personal to them. o The workers of a charity (Water Aid) in a MEDC have probably researched into how a small project can help. It is more financially achievable and can benefit a smaller amount of people but in a better way. People who may disagree with this could be: o The government of the country. They may want to do something that benefits more people than that which is of more benefit to a targeted amount of people. o Large companies that may want to make money out of bigger projects. ...read more.

Conclusion

People who disagree with large projects and think they are a waste of time and money may be: o The locals who got moved away from their home to make way for the project. o The people who had a connection with the area that was used for the project (eg; The Akosombo Damn flooded 4% of Ghana and many people must have had their work places there) o Environmentalists- they may feel that the amount of money spent on the large project could be spent a lot better with small-scale projects. They are also probably worried about the area surrounding the Akosombo Damn and how it got flooded. What do you think? Are small or large development projects better? I think that small-scale projects are more beneficial. Large projects could be more effective in the long term but what people need is something that will instantly begin to change their lives. When investing in a large project such as the Akosombo Damn there is no guarantee how things will work out; for the better or the worse. Small projects are much more reliable. They are there for one purpose and that one purpose will normally bring other good things with it. Small projects are tightly focused and targeted to what's required. They are designed to benefit a small group of people and they are very cost effective. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sophie Brooker 9C.1 Geography ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Global Interdependence & Economic Transition essays

  1. This piece of coursework is based on the tourism industry in less economically developed ...

    So tourists wont get discouraged and so they will come to Kenya again. Some parts of the country for example the National Parks depend on the money that comes in from tourists to keep it running and to pay for all the wages of the workers.

  2. Investigating Travel and Tourism

    Together with employment and GDP indicated in other sectors, such as transport or distributive trade, these figures rise up 20 million jobs and to roughly 12% of GDP. In the UK, residents made more than five times as many holiday visits abroad than overseas residents made to the UK.

  1. Development of the leisure and recreation industry

    Services Touring Arts Arts in Schools Visual Arts Performing Arts Festival and Events Prescot Museum Educational Services Special Events Community Events Local Events Regional Events National and International Events Library Service Recreational reading Educational Support Independent Learning for Adults Information Technology Library Facilities Local History Community and Youth Service Development

  2. The UK travel and tourism industry

    They are privately owned, typically set up by 1 or 2 individuals with practical experience of the industry, who have entered into a limited partnership, or may be a family business. In all cases they are usually managed by the owners, who are actively involved with the business on a

  1. The social costs and benefits of business activity- Paddington Basin Regeneration Project.

    This short-term loss can be argued with the fact that once the project is over the amount of tourist attracted to this place will increase steeply. The local council in charge of overseeing the entire project and its fulfilment of the objectives stated by the developers is Westminster Council.

  2. Globalisation isn't only about what is 'out there', remote and far away from the ...

    Western powers, spearheaded by American owned transnational corporations have monopolised world communications to such a degree that the economic well being and cultural identity of less powerful nations have been mightily damaged (James Lull) 3rd World countries are seen as a sight for cheap labour and low maintenance factories.

  1. How to make a good business?

    Moreover, some people claim that techno music is a very popular youth subculture thanks to which it is easy to win over young people. It is commonly known that one of the most important aims of the advertising industry is to attract people's attention.

  2. Bestwood Country Park is situated in North Nottinghamshire 4 miles north of the Nottingham ...

    It is also one of the few stretches of water nationally where water voles are still abundant. Within Bestwood Park's boundaries lies the largest reed bed on the River Lean containing many species of interest and rarity. Although reed beds alone are not often considered to have significant habitat variation

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work