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Hengistbury Head investigation.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Hengistbury Head investigation CONTENTS PAGE Page 3-Introduction Page 5- Data Collection Page 8- Data Presentation Page 16- Data Analysis Page 17- Bibliography Page 18- Appendix Introduction and aims Our aim in this investigation is to investigate the management of Hengistbury Head. Hengistbury Head is in the county of Dorset and it is 2 miles away from Christchurch. Hengistbury Head is 80-100miles from London and Bournemouth centre is approximately 6 miles to the west of it.. The nature of Hengistbury head is that it's headland alinges west to east towards Mudeford. It has 3 main sections which are the South facing cliffs, the east facing cliffs and Mudeford spit. Its Geology is that it is mainly sedimentary rocks and it has sandstone on the clay cliffs. To show this Geology I have taken a map from the internet which outlines the materials in Hengistbury Head. The cliffs also contain Iron because Iron forms in stagnant water areas over a long time. Hengistbury is a popular tourist destination and it attracts 1.5 million visitors a year, Hengistbury Head is a popular tourist destination because it is very peaceful and it is not as busy and loud as other coastal areas such as Brighton and Blackpool. This kind of peace is very important to elderly people and Hengistbury Head certainly caters for elderly people more than they do for younger people. Hengistbury Head also has a nature reserve which is classed as a SSSI site which means to contain rare species of birds. Hengistbury Head also has a Scheduled Ancient monument (Sam) which is the double dykes and it was a very important location 2500 years ago. ...read more.

Middle

Car Park Survey I will now draw a table to show the % usage of the car park during times during our visit. Group Time Spaces Used Working out % Usage B 12.00 pm 43 43/800 X 100 5.375% A 12.30 pm 54 54/800 X 100 6.75% F 1.00 pm 53 53/800 X 100 6.625% E 2.00 pm 65 65/800 X 100 8.125% D 2.30 pm 63 63/800 X 100 7.875% C 3.00 pm 52 52/800 X 100 6.5% I will now create a tally to show the origin of visitor's tax discs in a table. Christchurch 8 Bournemouth 14 Chippenam Aylesbury Ringwood Hunts Boureham Somerset Southampton 2 Reading Windsor Wing leighon Islington Birmingham 2 Dorking London North Hillington Norswood Sheffield Salisbury 3 Pool Barton Aldershot 2 Darlington Cheltenam I have decided to use a simple table for this survey because it is very simple and it is good to use if I have a large amount of results. Beach Work locations 1+6 For the beach work I have done I will calculate the mean sizes for length, width and depth of 10 pebbles at 3 points (near sea, middle and back of beach) Location 1 (Start of beach at end of double dykes) By the sea Mean length: 3+4+5+4+2+6+4+5+6+5/10= 2.6cm Mean Width: 2+3+3+1+1+2+3+2+5+2/10= 2.15cm Mean Depth: 1+2+4+1+2+3+0.5+1+2+1/10=0.95cm Middle of the beach Mean length: 2+1+2+4+1+2+3+5+6+2= 4.4cm Mean Width 1+2+1+0.5+3+4+2+4+3+1/10=2.4cm Mean Depth: 0.5+1+0.5+1+2+1+2+1+0.5+1/10=1.75cm Base of Cliff Mean length: 4+5+3+4+5+2+7+8+6+4/10=11.1cm Mean Width: 2+3+4+2+1+1+5+7+5+3/10=3.3cm Mean Depth: 1+2+3+6.5+1+2+1+2+1+0.5/10=2cm Location 6 (Cliff face at end of beach) By the sea Mean length: 4+3+5+2+4+6+2+2+4+3/10=3.5cm Mean Width: 2+1+3+2+1+2+3+4+2+1/10=2.1cm Mean Depth: 1+2+1+0.5+1.5+2+1.5+0.5+1.5+2=1.35cm Middle of the beach Mean length: 7+5+7+3+5+6+5+6+5+4/10=5.3cm Mean Width: 4+7+4+3+3+5+4+3+4/10=3.7cm Mean Depth: 4+1+1+0.5+1+1+1+1+1.5+/10=1.2cm Cliff foot Mean length: 15+9+11+9+6+16+12+8+12+10/10=10.8cm Mean Width: 12+4+4+9+4+8+7+8+7+4/10=6.7cm Mean Depth: 1+2+3+0.5+1+1+1+1.5+2+2.5/10=1.55cm I will now calculate the mean volumes for the rocks at each of the three areas at each location. ...read more.

Conclusion

Then the Pedestrian Count showed that the footpath by the sea was the most used path which is a favourite of elderly people and the headland was also popular during mid day. I think the management of Hengistbury Head have done well to manage the attraction and I think they have spent their money well. I think this because there seems to be no over crowding at Hengistbury Head and all there sea defences seem to be in good order and I see now problem with them at all. They have also tried to preserve wild life in the area and I think this is a very good idea because it attracts more tourists. I think the management of Hengistbury Head could be improved because it could be catered for a wider range of people and this would help reel more money in for sea defences etc they have done this in places like Devon and Cornwall who also suffer from Cliff erosion. The limitations I had to my work is that I only had one day to carry out my exercises and this meant that my results may not have been that accurate because I did not have at lease two or three sets of results. I also think that the weather was a determining factor in my exercises and this may have also changed my results. Then finally the last limitation to my work is the aspect of how new these sea defences are because some may have been better than others if they were newer and in better condition so the length of life of some of these defences may have been a factor which could have lead to a limitation to my work. ...read more.

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