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Herne Bay is situated along the stretch of the North Kent coast in Southeast. I choose to study this site because there are many different measures taken for coastal protection.

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Introduction

Introduction Herne Bay is situated along the stretch of the North Kent coast in Southeast. I choose to study this site because there are many different measures taken for coastal protection. I can get a broader range of results ending in a more accurate conclusion of the situation. The specific topic I have chosen to study is how and why do cliff and beach profiles vary along the stretch of the north Kent coast. I believe that the most well protected areas of the coast that I will study are likely to have the largest pebbles, the longest and the most level beaches. In the areas with little or no protection pebbles will be smaller if not be shingle and perhaps sand in some areas. The cliffs are also likely to be cut away from the bottom leaving them unstable and in some conditions causing slumping. It was decided after the storm of 1953, which caused disastrous flooding and wide spread destruction that Herne bay needed new improved sea defences. After some research into the matter by the local district council it was discovered that a storm of the same magnitude would return in an estimated period of a hundred years. When strong winds gather in the northern sea a factor known as the North Sea surge occurs at which time the sea level can raise up to two metres above the level of the normal waters which is what caused the catastrophic flooding in the storm of 1953. Previous attempts of sea defences in the 1920's and 1960's did little to protect central Herne Bay from the flooding in the storm in 1953, proving they were vastly inadequate and the sea was a considerable threat to the town. Despite the sea defences being some 600 metres long, the low quality concrete block wall was of little use against a destructive sea. Another storm in 1978 further prompted that something had to be done after it too caused flooding and included such damages ...read more.

Middle

Fig 1.5 Beach On the beach we had three main objectives: * Take a pebble analysis * Find out the beach angle * Finally find the beach length How to carry out the second two of the three main objectives is shown below: Location 1: East of Pier Beach Profile (Angle Measurements) Gradient of Beach = 7� Beach Width 32m Angle (Beach Edge) 6� 10� 4� 9� 7� Distance (Down Beach) 10 metres 5 metres 0.5 metres 0.2 metres 21 metres Random Pebble Samples Section 1 (Closest to the Sea) Sample 1 2 3 4 5 Mean(cm) Length 5 5 5 6 5 5.2 Breadth 5.5 7 3 3.5 3 4.4 Radius or Curvature 5 6 3 2.5 2 3.9 Type of Pebble (see fig 1.5) 4 5 6 5 4 4.8 Section 2 (Left of Centre) Sample 1 2 3 4 5 Mean(cm) Length 3 3 2 2.5 1.5 2.4 Breadth 2 2 1 1.5 1 1.5 Radius or Curvature 1.5 1 1.5 1 1 1.2 Type of Pebble (see fig 1.5) 6 6 5 2 2 4.2 Section 3 (Center) Sample 1 2 3 4 5 Mean(cm) Length 4 3.5 4.5 4 3 3.8 Breadth 3.5 2.5 4 2 2.3 2.86 Radius or Curvature 2 1.3 2 2 1.5 1.76 Type of Pebble (see fig 1.5) 3 3 4 5 5 4 Section 4 (Right of Centre) Sample 1 2 3 4 5 Mean(cm) Length 3 3 2 2 2 2.8 Breadth 1.5 2 2 2 1.5 1.8 Radius or Curvature 1.5 1.5 1 1 1 1.2 Type of Pebble (see fig 1.5) 2 3 6 5 2 3.6 Section 5 (Furthest from the Sea) Sample 1 2 3 4 5 Mean(cm) Length 1.5 3 2 2 4 2.5 Breadth 1.5 2 2 2 1.5 1.8 Radius or Curvature 1 1.5 1 1 2 1.3 Type of Pebble (see fig 1.5) 4 3 2 3 3 3 Point for Assessment Score What percentage of the view is open space? ...read more.

Conclusion

Are there a Variety of features in the view? (Score 1 point for each of the following: cliffs, beach, sea, river, valley, waterfall, cove, hills, lake, woodland.) Does the landscape have a variety of plants/vegetation? (Give a score relating to the scale below. Large number of plant 10 8 6 4 2 0 Few plant varieties.) What is the appeal of the area to you? Is it beautiful, exciting, dull, ugly? Give scores for the following: Appealing Points Unappealing Beautiful 3 2 1 0 Ugly Interesting 3 2 1 0 Boring Spectacular 3 2 1 0 Dull Varied 3 2 1 0 Monotonous Inviting 3 2 1 0 Hostile Total of all above What impact have people had on this landscape? Are there features made by people that spoil it? Blend with the environment 0 points deducted Have little negative impact 1 point deducted Have a strong negative impact 2 points deducted Pollute the environment 3 points deducted Deductions Final Score This Results Table shows the comparison between the Protected and Unprotected Cliffs at Bishopstone Glen. Protected Unprotected Width of Beach 24.7 metres 6.8metres Gradient of Beach 7� 9� AverageWave Frequency (Per minute) 34 50 Mean Wave Height (cm) 26 cm 15cm Pebble Analysis: Attempts Closest to the Sea 1 2 3 4 5 Protected Average Radius 3 3.5 3 1.5 1.5 Unprotected Average Radius 3 3 4 3 4 The Centre Protected Average Radius 3 1.5 3 1.5 1.5 Unprotected Average Radius 3 5 4 4 4 Furthest from the Sea Protected Average Radius 2 2 1.5 3 2 Unprotected Average Radius 3 3 3 4 3 Closest to the Sea 1 2 3 4 5 Protected Average Class 4 5 4 6 6 Unprotected Average Class 5 5 4 5 3 The Centre Protected Average Class 3 3 6 6 6 Unprotected Average Class 5 3 6 3 5 Furthest from the Sea Protected Average Class 3 3 6 3 4 Unprotected Average Class 4 3 4 2 3 Fig 1.6 Fig 1.7 Fig 1.8 Fig 1.9 Fig 2.0 Fig 2.1 25 1 ...read more.

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